Course Descriptions

Descriptions

111 – Biblical Hebrew – This course is a formal introduction to the basic rules and principles of Biblical Hebrew that is designed to facilitate critical reading of the Hebrew Bible. Emphases will be placed upon recognition and translation, employing a controlled vocabulary that consists of the most common Hebrew words and forms. Every class session will entail oral reading (some of which students will be required to tape) and writing exercises from the primary (i.e., Hebrew Bible) and/or resource (i.e., grammar book) texts. The premise of the course is that grammatical and literary analyses of the Hebrew texts are facilitated and complemented by writing Hebrew, including translating Hebrew into English, and that learning the language requires vocalization. Area One: Biblical Studies. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Polaski. Back to the top.

112 – Biblical Hebrew – This course is the sequel to RELS 111 and is designed to focus upon the principles of syntax and to further reading skills. Students will apply the rules and principles of Biblical Hebrew and thereby employ grammatical insights in reading and analyzing selected passages from the Hebrew Bible. This analysis will entail oral reading (some of which students will be required to tape) and diagramming of sentences from the Hebrew Bible. The premise of the course is that grammatical and literary analyses of the Hebrew texts are facilitated and complemented by writing Hebrew and that learning the language requires vocalization. The primary objective of the course is textual, grammatical, and literary criticism of the Hebrew Bible. Prerequisite: RELS 111. Area One: Biblical Studies. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Polaski. Back to the top.

205 – Introduction to Religion – An inquiry into the nature of religious experience and expression. Themes to be considered include interpretations of the term “religion,” theories of the origin of religion, myth and ritual, religious language, religious communities, religion and society. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

210 – Introduction to the Bible – A survey of the Old Testament and the New Testament, which introduces students to the history and literature of the Bible in conjunction with appropriate ways to critically read, study and analyze biblical texts drawn from the liberal arts. Not open to students who have successfully completed RELS 211 or RELS 212. Area One: Biblical Studies. Three hours. Polaski. Back to the top.

211 – The Hebrew Bible: History and Literature – A survey of the Old Testament documents in which attention is given to the theories of critical scholarship concerning such major problems in Old Testament studies as the origins of the literature, the historical development of the Old Testament community which produced the literature, and the significance of those writings in their own times. Not open to students who have completed RELS 210. Area One: Biblical Studies. Three hours. Polaski. Back to the top.

212 – The New Testament: History and Literature – An introductory survey of the literature of the early Christian church contained in the New Testament, utilizing current critical scholarship concerning such questions as the historical-cultural contexts in which the New Testament emerged, the content of the various New Testament documents, their meaning within their own time, and the kinds of religious questions addressed in the New Testament. Not open to students who have completed RELS 210. Area One: Biblical Studies. Three hours. Polaski. Back to the top.

215 - The Bible and Film – This course is designed to facilitate reading and appreciation of the Bible by investigating its use in the popular medium of film. Movies that employ biblical themes and/or portray biblical personalities will be viewed and critiqued in comparison with critical reading of the corresponding biblical texts in order to discern the interpretations and appropriations of the Bible that inform our culture. The goal of the course is to develop students’ consciousness of the overt and covert uses of the Bible in formation of modern worldviews. Area One: Biblical Studies. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Polaski. Back to the top.

217 – The Bible in America – This course will survey the history of the use of the Bible in the United States, paying attention to how it was interpreted and how these interpretations were applied during the growth and development of this nation and comparing and critiquing the instances of such within the greater society (e.g., arts, music, drama, government, etc.). This survey will be based upon a very general understanding of the Bible and of the history of the United States in order to aid research and cultural study. Area One: Biblical Studies. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Polaski. Back to the top.

221 – World Religions: Indian, Buddhist, Chinese, Japanese – An examination of the history, beliefs, and practices of living religions of the world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shinto, and Jainism. Consideration will be given to the variety of answers offered to life’s questions, and to the present encounter of world religions. Both primary and secondary sources will be used in learning the basic vocabulary, critical problems, and current state of each of the religions studied. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Three hours. Brown. Back to the top.

222 – World Religions: Judaic, Christian, Islamic – An examination of the history, literature, beliefs, and practices of living religions of the world: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Zoroastrianism, and Bahai. Consideration will be given to the variety of answers offered to life’s basic questions, and to the present encounter of world religions. Both primary and secondary sources Religious Studies 139 will be used in learning the basic vocabulary, critical problems, and current state of each of the religions studied. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

223 – Hinduism: History, Teachings, Practice – This course provides a thorough introduction to the diverse worlds of Hinduism. Through an exploration of the many layers of religious ideas and practices and the historic circumstances from which they emerge, students will gain an appreciation of the rich and pluralistic Hindu tradition of India and beyond. To accomplish this, students will carry out an inquiry that will range from archeological evidence of the oldest layers of the religious life in India, to the arrival of the Vedas, the composition of the Upanisads and the Epics, the emergence of the great devotional gods and goddesses, and to the everyday practices of Hindus today. Finally, the course will examine the Hindu diaspora, with a particular emphasis on Hindus in America and the continuing influence Hinduism exerts on the American religious imagination. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Brown. Back to the top.

225 – Buddhism: History, Teachings, Practice – This course provides a thorough introduction to the diverse worlds of Buddhism. Through an exploration of the life and teachings of its founder, as well as the historic and religious context of India out of which the tradition emerges, students will gain an understanding of Buddhism’s fundamental claims and practices. By studying the spread of Buddhism into East and Southeast Asia and how these cultures shaped their own unique forms of the tradition, students will obtain an appreciation for the tremendous impact this religion has had in countries such as China, Korea, Japan, Tibet, Sri Lanka, and Myanmar. Finally, the course will examine the arrival of Buddhism in America and the growing influence it is exerting on the American religious imagination. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Brown. Back to the top.

227 – Islam – This course is an introduction to and overview of Islam, from its beginnings to the present. The class examines the origins of Islam, the content and significance of the Qur’an, the role of Muhammad and the primary beliefs and practices of Muslims throughout the centuries. Students will study the development and expansion of Islam and its impact on politics, law, families, the arts and sciences, and other areas of society around the world. Students will learn about various groups within the Islamic tradition, such as Sunni, Shi’, Sufi, and The Nation of Islam. They will examine the relationship of Islam to other religions and the continuing importance of Islam throughout the world today. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Brown. Back to the top.

228 – New Religious Movements – This course examines the significance of the dramatic rise in New Religious Movements (NRMs) over the past century. With a focus on both the American and global scene, students will explore the following questions: What is the value of studying NRMs and what can they tell us about the dynamics of cultures, religions, and religion? What exactly are NRMs, what forms do they take, into what types can they be divided, and how are they differentiated from other religious traditions or movements? What historical and cultural conditions gave rise to such a burgeoning of NRMs in the past century? How have NRMs been perceived by traditional religions and by the wider population (e.g., as “cults” prone to brainwashing, violence, and sexual deviance)? Who generally joins such movements and why? What is the future of NRMs and what do they suggest about the future of religion? In the process of this inquiry, students will be- come acquainted with the history, beliefs, and practices of many NRMs throughout the world, such as Wicca, the New Age Movement, Eco-religions, Branch Davidians, People’s Temple, Soka Gakkai, Falun Gong, Aum Shinrikyo, Heaven’s Gate, Scientology, Santeria and Rastafarianism. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Brown. Back to the top.

229 – Native American Religions – This course will introduce students to the diverse religious traditions of the Native Americans. First, students will explore the variety of tribal traditions and their religious ties to the landscape. Second, the course will examine the importance of Christianity across the Native American traditions. Third, it will study the formation of new religious movements that extend beyond tribal ties. Finally, students will look at recent attempts by Native people to create a pan-Native American religious identity or spirituality that is frequently posed as an alternative to modern, Western culture. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Brown. Back to the top.

230 – Judaism – A general introduction to the Jewish faith. The course will give attention to the emergence, structure, and content of the vast body of Jewish literature, beginning with the Hebrew Bible; basic Jewish tenets covering aspects of Jewish law and customs, including the Jewish calendar and the festival cycle in particular; major Jewish events and personalities shaping Jewish history and destiny. Area Two: The World’s Religious Traditions. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

231 – Christianity – An introduction to Christianity, from its beginnings to the present. We will learn about Christian faith and practice through an overview of the religion’s scripture, history, worship, institutions, theology, and teachings, and give attention to many of Christianity’s most important and influential persons, groups, and movements. We will study interactions between Christianity and the cultures and societies in which it arose and developed, trace the religion’s spread throughout the world, and reflect on challenges and opportunities confronting Christianity today. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

235 – Religious Ethics – An introduction to religious ethics, as both a field of study and a way of life. By examining the ethics of major living world religions, students will learn about the relationship between religious faith and practice and personal and social ethics. We will study ways in which religious traditions and faith communities, in different cultural and historical contexts, affect moral action and decision making and the relationship of these to specific and basic ethical concerns of the human community. We will also investigate how major living religious traditions understand and address specific ethical issues, such as war, economics, marriage and families, and the environment. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Three hours. Breitenberg. Back to the top.

237 – Christian Ethics – This course examines how the Christian tradition, past and present, understands and teaches how Christians should live, what they should and should not do, and the kinds of persons they should be. We will study the development of Christian ethics and consider similarities and differences between Protestant and Catholic approaches. Persistent and contemporary moral issues and concerns will be addressed—such as war and peace, terrorism, economics, the environment, globalization, capital punishment, euthanasia, abortion, and cloning—along with various Christian responses to them. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Three hours. Breitenberg. Back to the top.

240 – Italy: Heritage of Christianity – This on-site course is designed to acquaint students with the rich heritage of Christianity, focusing on selected sites of interest from the first century through the rise of the imperial church, medieval and renaissance periods, and modern Christianity. A major component of this focus will be artistic and architectural treasures. Sites visited include Venice, Florence, Assisi, and Rome. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Offered infrequently. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

243 – Reformation and Counter Reformation – A study of the leading persons, theologies, movements, and communities of the Reformation and Counter Reformation of the 16th and 17th centuries. We will study their religious, social, cultural, artistic, and political contexts as well as the significant and enduring influence of the Reformation and Counter Reformation for Europe and the West. We will also see how music was an expression of and a means of spreading the Reformation and Counter Reformation, or a target of them, and study the role of music and the various forms it took in different religious traditions of the period. The class will travel to Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Italy, and Hungary. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Offered infrequently. Three hours. Breitenberg. Back to the top.

244 – English Reformation and Rise of Methodism – A study of the leading persons, theologies, movements, and communities of the English Reformation as well as the origins and development of Methodism in Great Britain, the American colonies, and the early republic. We will consider religious, social, cultural, artistic, and political contexts affecting the Reformation in England and beginnings of the Methodist tradition as well as the significant and enduring influence of both. We will also explore music as an expression of the English Reformation and learn how it was a means of spreading Methodist beliefs. The class will travel to England and Scotland. Area Two: The World’s Religious Traditions. Offered infrequently. Three hours. Breitenberg. Back to the top.

246 – Jewish and Christian Identities in Ancient Israel/Palestine – This travel course will examine the development of Judaism and Christianity under the Roman Empire and Hellenistic Culture. It will provide a historical introduction to the period from the Maccabean Revolt through the Christianization of the region after Constantine. It will cover such topics as the Qumran community, Herod the Great, the Jewish revolts against Rome, the life of Jesus, and the rise of Christian holy places. It will include visits to Qumran and the Dead Sea, the Old City of Jerusalem, Sepphoris, Caesarea Maritima, Panias, Masada, Herodium, and others. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Three hours. Polaski. Back to the top.

247– Jewish and Christian Identities in Today’s Israel/Palestine – This travel course will examine the existence of Jews and Christians in today’s Israel/ Palestine, focusing of the complexity of these groups. It will provide a historical introduction to the region from the mid-19th century to the present. It will cover such topics as Jewish Messianism, Ultra-Orthodox Judaism, Judaism and Conversion, Issues surrounding Judaism, Women and Gender, the Land as Symbol in Jewish Identity, the Relation of Holocaust to Jewish/ Israeli Identity, Christian Apocalyptic Speculation, Palestinian Christianity, Christian Diversity in Jerusalem and Christian Israelis. It will also include discussions with a variety of Israeli and Palestinian thinkers and activists, and will feature visits to Bethlehem, Jerusalem, Nazareth, Lake Kinneret, Masada, Yad Vashem, Mt. Herzl, Old Jaffa/Tel Aviv, and others. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Three hours. Polaski. Back to the top.

248 – Religions of Japan: Land of Kami, Land of Buddhas – This course travels to Japan and provides a historical and cultural exploration of Japanese religious ideas and practices. Though the main focus will be on the religious tradition of Shinto and the many forms of Buddhism in Japan, the course will also consider the influence and impact of folk religion, Confucianism, Daoism, Christianity, and the wide array of new religious movements that have emerged in recent history. A particular focus of the course will be on the manner in which religion has so profoundly shaped multiple aspects of Japanese life, including the arts, politics, popular culture, and views of the natural environment. Area Two: The World’s Religious Traditions. Brown. Three hours. Back to the top.

251 – Literature of the Holocaust – A study of the impact of the Holocaust upon individuals and groups as evidenced in writings, films, and works of art. The course begins with a historical study, then examines various forms of Holocaust literature produced by survivors of the Holocaust and by its perpetrators, victims, resisters, and bystanders. These works include eyewitness accounts, fiction, poetry, diaries, tales, oral histories, visual arts, music, and videos. We will also learn from the work of Holocaust scholars. Throughout the course we will give attention to religion’s role in the Holocaust and ask about the Holocaust’s continuing significance for both personal and social ethics and religious faith and practice. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Breitenberg. Back to the top.

260 – Religions and the Natural Environment – This course will introduce students to the historical and contemporary relations between multiple religious traditions and the natural environment. Particular emphasis will be placed on Native American traditions, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Christianity. Students will examine scholarly works on the history, texts, rituals and activism of religious traditions, as well as engage with sacred texts and creative works on the subject. In addition, students will explore a variety of contemporary perspectives from within new religious movements as well as secular environmental movements that frequently perpetuate and/or appropriate religious views of the natural environment. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Brown. Back to the top.

262 – Religion and Science – An introduction to religion and science and the relationship between them. We will examine some of the most important perspectives, events, discoveries, theories, and texts that influenced religion, science and the broader societies in which they developed along with changing perceptions of connections between them. Topics include a survey of the history of the relationship between religion and science, major debates and turning points in that relationship, and contemporary issues. While Christianity and science in Europe and America are the primary areas of study, we will also consider the relationship between science and other religions. Offered every two or three years. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Three hours. Breitenberg. Back to the top.

271 – Women and Religion – This course offers both historical and contemporary perspectives on the situation of women in a variety of religious traditions throughout the world. The course provides a broad survey of religions, including Eastern World Religions (such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shinto), Western World Religions (such as Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) and Indigenous Traditions (such as Australian, African, and Native American). In addition, the class examines the significant impact of feminist critique in the study of religion, the recent emergence of goddess centered religions in the West, and the development of ecofeminist theologies and spirituality. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

273 – Women in the Bible – This course is designed to facilitate reading and appreciation of passages about, referring to, or imaging women in the Bible, treating these as ancient forms of communication. The goal of the course is twofold: to read the selected passages in their respective contexts and to sensitize readers of the Bible to the negative as well as positive effects of its gendered-speech. Area One: Biblical Studies. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Polaski. Back to the top.

274 – Women and Christianity – A study of women in the Christian tradition, from biblical times to the present. We will examine some of the many ways women have been understood, interpreted, and portrayed throughout the history of the Christian faith and within various Christian churches, denominations, sects, and movements. Topics include biblical images of women, women in the early churches, women in medieval Christianity, and women in monastic orders. The roles of women in the Reformation, American Colonies, and organizations for mission and reform will also be studied, as well as changing conceptions of women and ordained ministry. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

275 – Liberation Theology – An examination of the development and expression of liberation theology through the study of representative writings emerging from current liberation movements (Black, feminist, Latin American); theological and ethical resources on which they draw; the delineation of unresolved problems such as the liberation of oppressors and viable forms of political and social transformation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Offered every three or four years. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

280 – Religion in America – A study of the development and significance of religion in the United States of America, from the colonial period to the present. Consideration will be given to the beliefs, practices, and interactions of religious traditions in the United States and how these affected the broader society and were in turn influenced by it. Students will gain an understanding of the role of religion and its importance for American life and thought. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Breitenberg. Back to the top.

282 - African-American Religion - A study of African-American religious beliefs and practices from the colonial period to the present. This course examines the religious life and experiences of African-American individuals and groups. Situated within the larger context of religion in America and the dominant religious traditions of the broader society, African-American religion developed out of a combination of European Christianity and elements of African indigenous religions into the “invisible institution” of the antebellum South and later blossomed into a variety of new Christian denominations as well as Islamic and other religious traditions. Students will learn ways in which African-American religion drew from, contributed to, and challenged aspects of dominant religious traditions in the U.S. and how it holds a unique and important place in American religious, social, and cultural history. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Offered every other year. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

311 – Prophecy in Ancient Israel – A study of the life and message of the Old Testament prophets within their historical context. Attention will be given to the socio-political dimensions of prophecy within ancient Israel and Judah. Students are expected to become familiar with the critical theories concerning the prophetic literature through a study of the scholarly literature. Prerequisite: RELS 210, 211, or permission of instructor. Area One: Biblical Studies. Offered every three years. Three hours. Polaski. Back to the top.

312 – Biblical Short Stories – This course examines narrative texts from the period during which Judaism emerged (515 BCE-70 CE). Stories are drawn from the Hebrew Bible, the Apocrypha, and other ancient sources. We will read these texts as narratives, exploring their literary artistry, but will also consider what they might say about the development of religious identity. Area One: Biblical Studies. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Polaski. Back to the top.

321 – Life and Teaching of Jesus – In this course students will investigate such topics as the history of Jesus-research since the 18th century, the sources of information about Jesus, what one can know about the life of Jesus of Nazareth, the “kingdom of God” teaching, the works of Jesus and their relationship to his ministry, and the ethical teaching of Jesus. The course is conducted on a seminar basis in which each student is expected to prepare papers for presentation and discussion in class. Prerequisite: RELS 210, 212, or permission of instructor. Area One: Biblical Studies. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

322 – Life and Letters of Paul – A study of the Pauline Epistles and current thought concerning the Apostle Paul. Special attention is given to his contribution to the development of Christian thought and its relevance to our day. Students will be expected to familiarize themselves with the major problems of Pauline studies and current scholarship regarding them. Prerequisite: RELS 210, or 212, or permission of instructor. Area One: Biblical Studies. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

323 – The Book of Revelation – This course will approach Revelation as an example of the literary genre “apocalypse.” Through comparison with other apocalyptic texts (especially Daniel), and with prophetic materials from the Hebrew Bible, the student will gain entrance into the intricate symbolic world of Revelation. Consideration will be given to the likely social and historical context of the book, and to the light such information can cast upon the function of the work in its original setting. The focus of the course, however, will be the close reading of the text itself. Prerequisite: RELS 210, 211, or 212, or permission of instructor. Area One: Biblical Studies. Offered every three years. Three hours. Polaski. Back to the top.

335 – History of Christianity from the Early Church to the Protestant Reformation – A survey of the development of the Christian Church from the second century to the beginning of the Protestant Reformation. Particular attention will be given to theological controversies and Church Councils, the expansion of the Church into the West in the early Middle Ages, the relationships between Western and Eastern Churches, the Crusades, monasticism, and the influence of the Renaissance. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Offered every two to three years. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

336 – History of Christianity from the Protestant Reformation to the Present – Attention will be given to the rise and development of denominations, major theologies, controversies, and trends. Topics explored will also include the Counter Reformation, the Great Awakening, conflicts between science and religion, fundamentalism, liberalism, ecumenism, and third world developments. Area Two: World’s Religious Traditions. Offered every two to three years. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

341 – Contemporary Theology and Ethics – This course is designed to introduce the student to the field of theology through a study of selected contemporary theological issues and directed reading in works by theologians including Tillich, Bultmann, Bonhoeffer, Barth, Ruether, Niebuhr, Trible and Buber. Students will be expected to research assigned topics and to prepare papers for presentation and class discussion. Prerequisites: Two previous courses in the department or permission of the instructor. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

343 - Civil Religion and Public Theology – A study of two related but different topics: civil religion and public theology. We will learn about the history and development of civil religion and public theology, consider the relationship between them, and study the areas of religious and public life they address. We will analyze the relationship of civil religion to American society and the U.S. presidency and study public theologies concerned with things such as government, economics, the family, the environment, health, and human rights. While civil religion and public theology in the U.S.A. is our primary focus, we will also treat these in other parts of the world and consider their potential future significance. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Breitenberg. Back to the top.

352 – Religion and Literature – This course relates major themes in the literary works of mostly 20th century European, American, Native American, African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian authors with the concerns of religion. Emphasis will be placed upon how these writers, in very different cultural and religious contexts, have struggled with the relevance and applicability of traditional religious ideas and practices in the modern world. Students will be expected to research assigned topics and to conduct class discussions dealing with their research. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Brown. Back to the top.

375 – Christianity and Sexuality – An exploration of the theological dimension of human sexuality and how differing faith perspectives understand issues in sexuality. Concerns that face individuals and how these are framed through religious experience will be examined. Issues include the role of women in the church, AIDS, pornography, family life education, homosexuality, and abortion. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

384 – Contemporary American Religion – A study of religion in the United States from the mid-twentieth century to the present. We focus on continuities and changes in mainline Protestantism and Catholicism, the lasting significance of Judaism, the increasing importance of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam, the flourishing of indigenous religions, and the rise of New Religious Movements. We also examine the interplay of religion with politics, law, race, gender, science, social issues, and American culture. Area Three: Religion and Culture. Offered every two or three years. Three hours. Breitenberg. Back to the top.

401 – Religious Studies Capstone – A culminating experience in which a religious studies major integrates, extends, and applies knowledge and skills from the student’s general education and major programs, drawing especially on terms, concepts, and methods associated with religious studies. Students will meet in weekly seminars to analyze and discuss readings selected from the three areas of emphasis within the major. Senior status or junior status with consent of department chair. Open to religious studies minors with consent of department chair. Three hours. Staff. Back to the top.

450 – Internship – Students will have opportunity to gain practical experience in the application of their learning in religious studies to actual situations through a field placement with area churches, church-related agencies, and organizations whose concerns focus upon social/ethical/religious issues. Application required; see Bassett Internship Program. Three hours. Back to the top.

481-482 – Special Topics – Designed to meet the needs and interests of advanced students. Topics will vary but may include an intensive study and interpretation of figures and movements in religion not covered in the general curriculum. Three hours each. Back to the top.

491-492 – Independent Study – An independent study under the guidance of a member of the department. At least a 3.25 cumulative GPA and approval by the curriculum committee are required. Three hours each. Back to the top.

496-498 – Senior Project – Senior majors may select an area of religious studies in which they will undertake intensive and independent research. Six hours. Back to the top.