Course Descriptions

105 – Environmental Problem Solving I – Interdisciplinary problem solving is the central skill needed by environmental professionals, and examining real-world issues best develops this skill. This course will focus on a local or regional environmental issue, and we will work with government, business, and community leaders in order to analyze the issue from the varying perspectives of these stakeholders. At the end of the course we will provide the stakeholders with a detailed analysis that draws on information from the natural sciences, social sciences, and the humanities. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirements in the Natural Science Area of Knowledge. Intended primarily for students seriously considering EVST as their major. Four hours. Gowan, Fenster.

305 – Environmental Problem Solving II – This course is the second in a three-course sequence devoted to environmental problem solving using real-world issues. Building on the skills and knowledge introduced in EVST 105, this course will focus on a more complex local or regional environmental issue than the one analyzed in EVST 105, and you will be expected to use information from your Area of Expertise courses when analyzing the issue. Like EVST 105, students will work with government, business, and community leaders in order to analyze the issue from the varying perspectives of these stakeholders. At the end of the course we will provide the stakeholders with a detailed analysis that draws on information from the natural sciences, social sciences, and the humanities. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirements in the Natural Science Area of Knowledge. Recommended for those with junior standing in the EVST major. Prerequisite: EVST 105. Four hours. Gowan, Fenster.

405 – Environmental Problem Solving III – This course is the third in a three-course sequence devoted to environmental problem solving using real-world issues, and it is the capstone to the EVST major. Building on the skills and knowledge introduced in EVST 105, deepened in the Area of Expertise, and practiced in EVST 305, this course will focus on a different local or regional environmental issue than was analyzed in EVST 105 and EVST 305. Like EVST 105 and EVST 305, we will work with government, business, and community leaders, but students will be in charge of all aspects of the analysis. Moreover, students enrolled in EVST 405 will meet concurrently with and serve as project leaders for EVST 305 students who will be working on the same issue. At the end of the course we will provide the stakeholders with a detailed analysis drawing on information from the natural sciences, social sciences, and the humanities. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirements in the Natural Science Area of Knowledge, and as an Interdisciplinary course. Recommended for those with senior standing in the EVST major. Prerequisites: EVST 105 and 305. Four hours. Gowan, Fenster.

106 – EVST Success Strategies – This course is for freshman or sophomores considering EVST as a major. Because EVST is a broad topic, you have to decide which area of specialty most interests you. You might choose some aspect of biology, political science, geology, sociology, chemistry, physics, or any of a number of other disciplines. You will explore career options in EVST with the help of outside guests from government, private industry, and non-profit environmental organizations, and will plan your EVST Area of Expertise to prepare you for the upper-level EVST core courses and your chosen area of specialty. One hour. Gowan, Fenster

200 – Geographic Information Systems with Environmental Applications – This course covers the fundamentals of geographic information systems (GIS) to display and analyze spatial data with emphasis on environmental applications and the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) to collect spatial data in the field. Students will use ESRI’s ArcMap software to learn basic mapping theory (e.g., coordinate systems), edit geographic and tabular data, analyze spatial data, create databases, and produce maps that display and analyze spatial data. Students will also learn how to collect spatial field data using state-of-the-art, survey-grade GPS units and software and import those data into GIS. The course is taught in an integrated lecture-field (laboratory) approach. Prerequisite: EVST 105. Three hours. Gowan.

213 – Environmental Ethics – This course addresses basic issues of environmental ethics: the value of ecosystems (both inherent and instrumental), human beings’ treatment of animals and non-animal nature, the meaning and justification of moral obligations to species and to the environment, and the complex and profound ways in which our actions with regard to the environment affect our fellow human beings. We will apply moral theory to environmental problems in the enterprise of formulating an adequate ethical approach to our environment. Recommended: PHIL 212 and EVST 105. Offered every two-three years. Cross-listed with EVST 213. Three hours. Huff. 220

219 – Politics of the Environment – Students will gain an overview of the political ramifications of the interaction of environmentalism, environmental science, and politics. We will examine this relationship in terms of environmental and democratic theory, as well as through a political science understanding of the American system of law and regulation. The seminar based course tracks how environmental issues have historically developed into legitimate political issues and how those issues translate into the current United States political climate. To this end, students will examine germane, contemporary issues, such as the climate change debate where political disagreement over the legitimacy of the issue with respect to public opinion and the state of science in the field. No prior knowledge of political science or environmental science is required. This course satisfies an AOK in the social sciences. Three hours. Staff.

225 – Environmental Law – Students will gain an overview of the essential concepts of environmental law that shape the practice of environmental and political science, and learn how to analyze issues in their legal contexts with regard to the environment. The course provides a historical survey of the field from its common law roots to its current applications dealing legislatively with a variety of complex environmental issues, such as air and water pollution, loss of species diversity, and global climate change. It is taught as a seminar in which the historical development of common law concepts and the evolution of the present complex of statutory laws are highlighted through study of the major court cases that have guided environmental legislation and policies. Cross-listed with PSCI 225. Three hours. Staff.

226 – Environmental Policy – Students will be afforded the opportunity to develop an awareness and appreciation of the national public policymaking process, especially as it applies to the environment. Students will be involved actively in the study of environmental policymaking through a variety of approaches: seminar discussions, the case study approach to problem-solving, cooperative research projects and presentations, and field trips. Cross-listed with PSCI 226. Three hours. Staff.

334 – Leadership Communication – An examination of the paradigms and strategies of leadership, the course will, first, offer lessons in which concepts, models, and tools are introduced and, second, form students into consulting teams working to solve real problems. Three hours. Merrill.

450 – Field Studies in Environmental Studies – Field studies is intended to provide environmental studies majors with an opportunity to gain first-hand experience in the environmental workplace. Placements are possible with private, state, or federal agencies, committees of the U.S. Congress, or with environmental advocacy groups. Open only to environmental studies majors or by permission of the Environmental Studies Council. Junior standing required. Offered any term throughout the year. Three hours. Staff.

451-452 – Internship in Environmental Studies – The internship in environmental studies is intended to provide qualified environmental studies majors with an opportunity to gain first-hand experience in the environmental workplace. Internship placements are possible with private, state, or federal agencies, committees of the U.S. Congress, or with environmental advocacy groups. Open only to environmental studies majors or by permission of the Environmental Studies Council. Junior standing required. Offered any term throughout the year. Three hours each term. Staff.