Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses

The Classics Department offers a wide variety of courses through which learners can explore the Greco-Roman world. Courses are divided into three groupings: Classics in English (CLAS), Classics in Latin (LATN), and Classics in Greek (GREK). To see the course descriptions of current offerings, scroll down. If you are looking for a particular class, try the following links:


Classics in English (CLAS)

CLAS/ARTH 210 —Origins of Civilization

TR 9:40–11:10 — Fisher

When did civilization begin? How do we define civilization? How do we know when civilization has occurred and when it has ended? Why is civilization important to humans? What is the role of the arts in defining a civilization? In this course we will look at the development of early cultures and “civilizations”. We will compare definitions of civilization and the processes by which a civilization develops and wanes. Satisties part of the Civilizations AOK requirement as HIST101. Three hours.


CLAS/ARTH 221 — Archaeological Methods and Theory

TR 3:00–5:00 — Fisher

Archaeology is the study of the human past through material remains. Why are we intrigued by archaeology? Whose interests are served by archaeology? This course introduces the theory, methods, and ethical issues of archaeology. Topics include the responsibilities of the archaeologist, stewardship of cultural remains, and tasks such as site identification, sutvey, excavation, and artifact conservation. Special emphasis is on applied sciences such as archaeological chemistry, bioarchaeology, geoarchaeology, and archaeometry which provide analyses of artifacts primarily for the purposes of finding dates and provenances. The course does not focus on specific cultures or past discoveries; the methods and approaches presented here are widely used by archaeologists in all areas of the world. This course involves field work, and has a laboratory component. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement as a natural science with laboratory. Offered alternate years. Four hours. Instructor permission required.


CLAS 223— Classical Mythology

Online — Natoli

Athena. Hercules. Odysseus. Despite their chronological distance from us, the characters and tales of Greco-Roman mythology are quite familiar and have been profoundly influential in shaping Western culture, inspiring everything from art and literature, to notions of sexuality and gender, to the themes of Hollywood blockbusters. In this course, learners will be introduced to the major Greco-Roman myths and will consider questions about the universal and not-so-universal sides of stories about gods, heroes, and humans that expressed important messages about cultural values and individual fears, about our interior human world and the often greater-than-human forces and impulses that act upon us. Three hours.


CLAS 225— Roman Daily Life

TR 8–9:30 — Daugherty

What did it mean to be a Roman? By looking at both the physical and literary remains, this course will survey the basic structures of Roman Society, the typical urban and rural monuments of the Latin–speaking world, and the intimate details of the daily lives of individuals and families. Three hours. Three hours.


CLAS 226 —Ancient Warfare

MW 11:30–1:00 — Daugherty

Most of Ancient History is military history, and much of Greek and Roman art and literature treats wars, warriors and their impact on society. This course will examine the practice of warfare in the Greek Polis, the Macedonian Kingdoms, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire. Themes include the technical aspects (logistics, intelligence, strategy, naval warfare, and armor), but we will also examine the literary and artistic interpretations of war and the sociological and psychological aspects. No prior knowledge of military history or Greco/Roman history expected or required. Offered alternate years. Three hours.


CLAS/ARTH 227 — African Art

MW 1:10–2:40 — Fisher

Systems of sexuality and gender in ancient Greece and Rome were very different from our own. The aim of this course is to explore the cultural construction of sexuality and gender in ancient Greece and Rome, approaching them through their depictions in the archaeological and literary record. We will consider questions such as the status of women and the context of misogyny, the multiple manners in which masculinity was constructed, the societal role of same-sex relations, the presentation and visualization of sexuality, desire, and the body. This interdisciplinary approach will allow us to gain an understanding of what Greek and Roman systems of sexuality and gender were, how they changed over time, and how they can be used to offer insights into the shaping of our own cultural and personal attitudes towards sexuality and gender. Three hours. Counts towards the Social Science AOK, WMST major or minor, and CLAS major or minor.


CLAS 401—Capstone

TBA — Fisher

A culminating experience in which a Classics, Latin, or Greek major will integrate, extend, and apply knowledge and skills from the student’s general education and major programs. Enrollment is through a project contract which may include one of the following: student teaching in a Latin program, participation in a Classics Department Learning Community abroad, completion of a semester at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome or the College Year in Athens, participation in an approved archaeological excavation, participation in an approved internship, a departmental honors course, a research experience outside of a class (including SURF), or a significant research project completed in conjunction with a regularly scheduled major course. Prerequisites: senior status or junior status with consent of Chair. 0 hours.


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Classics in Latin (LATN)

LATN 112 — Elementary Latin II

MWF 9:10 –10:10 — Natoli

Latin is one of the basic languages to learn for better command of English; over 65% of the English vocabulary is based on Latin. Latin 112 will further acquaint you with the principal forms and structures of Latin in an interesting and challenging manner. The aim is to proceed to the reading of connected Latin passages as soon as possible and to be able to identify grammatical and syntactical functions of Latin sentences in context. At the end of this class, learners will be able to:

  1. Define basic Latin vocabulary (appx. 750 words).
  2. Identify the grammatical forms of Latin words.
  3. Identify the syntactical functions of Latin words.
  4. Analyze the syntax of a Latin sentence.
  5. Use different strategies to translate Latin.

LATN 212 — Intermediate Latin II

MWF 8 –9 — Carlson

Latin is one of the basic languages to learn for better command of English; over 65% of the English vocabulary is based on Latin. Latin 211 will continue to acquaint you with the principal forms and structures of Latin in an interesting and challenging manner. The aim is to proceed to the reading of connected Latin passages as soon as possible and to be able to identify grammatical and syntactical functions of Latin sentences in context.

  1. Define basic Latin vocabulary (appx. 750 words).
  2. Identify the grammatical forms of Latin words.
  3. Identify the syntactical functions of Latin words.
  4. Analyze the syntax of a Latin sentence.
  5. Use different strategies to translate Latin.

LATN 343 — Roman Epic

MW 1:10 – 2:40 — Natoli

In this course, students will read selections from Ennius' Annales, Vergil’s Aeneid, and Lucan's Pharsalia. The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in LATN 115 and 215 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Roman Epic; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

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Classics in Greek (GREK)

GREK 112 — Elementary Greek II

MWF 9:10–10:10 — Fisher

Further practice in the grammatical structures of the Greek language with increased emphasis upon the reading of simple Greek prose. Prerequisite: GREK 111. Three hours.


GREK 346: New Testament Greek

MWF 10:20 – 11:20 — Daugherty

Selections from the Gospels and the Pauline letters with special emphasis on problems of exegesis and historical criticism. Prerequisite: GREK 212 or 215. Three hours.

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