Fall 2017 Classics Courses

The Classics Department offers a wide variety of courses through which learners can explore the Greco-Roman world. Courses are divided into three groupings: Classics in English (CLAS), Classics in Latin (LATN), and Classics in Greek (GREK). To see the course descriptions of current offerings, scroll down. If you are looking for a particular class, try the following links:


Classics in English (CLAS)

CLAS/ARTH 213— Greek Art and Archaeology

TR 9:40–11:10 — Camp

This course covers the art and archaeology of Greece from the Bronze Age through the Archaic, Classical, and early Hellenistic periods. The emphasis will be on the legacy of the Greek civilization to Western art, city planning, and thought. Illustrated lectures. Three hours.


CLAS 311— Greek History

TR 8–9:30 — Daugherty

A chronological survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of Greek history from the Minoan and Mycenaean beginnings to the period of Roman domination. Cross-listed with HIST 311. Offered alternate years. Three hours.


CLAS/ARCH 320 —Archaeological Ethics

TR 1:20–2:50 — Fisher

Who owns the past? Who should profit from archaeological discoveries? Where should antiquities be stored or displayed? Who should pay for the safety, conservation, and preservation of sites and artifacts? Should modern descendants have the option to prevent archaeological research aimed at their ancestors or museum exhibition of their ancestral material culture? Who should interpret the past of a culture or group of people? This course covers the current international and US laws which govern historic preservation, cultural resource management, archaeology, and commerce in antiquities; considers numerous case studies which have led to the creation of codes of ethics and professional standards for archaeologists and museums; and debates some of the diverse points of view concerning archaeological ethics and practice. Cross-listed with CLASS 320. Offered alternate years. Three hours. 


CLAS 381 — Cleopatra

MW 1:10–2:40 — Daugherty

Cleopatra was a witness to and a shaper of history. Her death is used to mark the end of the Hellenistic Age because she was the last Macedonian monarch, the last Hellenistic ruler to fall to Rome, and the last Pharaoh of Egypt – the incarnation of Isis herself. A woman in a man's world, she helped destroy the Roman Republic, and watched the Augustan Principate devour the remains. To Roman men she was a fascination and an archenemy; To Roman women she was a role model and a symbol of the decadent east; To posterity she is an enigma, but her image in film, literature, art and popular culture is ever present.


CLAS/ARCH 450—Field Studies in Archaeology

TBA — Fisher

This course is an excavation, field research, or museum experience. The student will gain experience with archaeological techniques for survey, excavation, analysis, conservation, classification and recording on an approved excavation or in a museum or laboratory setting. A minimum of four weeks or 130 hours of participation in an excavation, field school, or museum program is required. If a student participates during the summer in an excavation or field school which is not part of the Randolph-Macon College summer session, the student should take ARCH 450 in the next term of residency at Randolph-Macon College. Permission of instructor required. Cross-listed with CLASS 450. Offered as needed. Three hours each.


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Classics in Latin (LATN)

LATN 111 — Elementary Latin I

MWF 9:10 –10:10 — Natoli

Latin is one of the basic languages to learn for better command of English; over 65% of the English vocabulary is based on Latin. Latin 111 will acquaint you with the principal forms and structures of Latin in an interesting and challenging manner. The aim is to proceed to the reading of connected Latin passages as soon as possible and to be able to identify grammatical and syntactical functions of Latin sentences in context. At the end of this class, learners will be able to:

  1. Define basic Latin vocabulary (appx. 500 words).
  2. Identify the grammatical forms of Latin words.
  3. Identify the syntactical functions of Latin words.
  4. Analyze the syntax of a Latin sentence.
  5. Use different strategies to translate Latin.

LATN 212 — Intermediate Latin I

MWF 8 –9 — Carlson

Latin is one of the basic languages to learn for better command of English; over 65% of the English vocabulary is based on Latin. Latin 211 will continue to acquaint you with the principal forms and structures of Latin in an interesting and challenging manner. The aim is to proceed to the reading of connected Latin passages as soon as possible and to be able to identify grammatical and syntactical functions of Latin sentences in context.

  1. Define basic Latin vocabulary (appx. 750 words).
  2. Identify the grammatical forms of Latin words.
  3. Identify the syntactical functions of Latin words.
  4. Analyze the syntax of a Latin sentence.
  5. Use different strategies to translate Latin.

LATN 215 — Intensive Intermediate Latin

TR 9:40 –11:40 — Natoli

This course is the final step in the beginning-intermediate sequence, and is designed for advanced first-year students who have completed four or more years of high school Latin or who have scored well on AP/IB tests. In Latin 215, we will read the entirety of Seneca’s Apocolocyntosis, a unique and challenging text from the mid-1st century CE. The aim of the class is to develop learners’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax, while introducing learners to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary; to introduce learners to the literary and historical context of Seneca’s Apocolocyntosis; and to expose learners to the basic features of Latin meter.


LATN 344 — Advanced Latin Historiography

MWF 10:20 – 11:20 — Daugherty

Selections from Livy, Tacitus, Sallust, Caesar, or Suetonius. Prerequisite: LATN 212, 215, or placement. Offered every four years. Three hours.

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Classics in Greek (GREK)

GREK 111 — Elementary Greek I

MWF 9:10–10:10 — Fisher

A linguistically-oriented approach to the study of the Greek language with emphasis on grammatical structure and the acquisition of an elementary reading facility. Offered every year. Three hours.


GREK 215 — Intensive Intermediate Greek

MWF 9:10-10:10 + TBA — Fisher

An accelerated course which completes the collegiate requirement in foreign languages in ancient Greek, and prepares students to take advanced courses in Classical and Koine Greek. Brief review of grammar, syntax, and morphology, along with concentrated reading skill development and intensive vocabulary study through readings in Classical and New Testament Greek. Prerequisite: GREK 112 or a placement by department. Offered every fall. Four hours.


GREK 481: Aristophanes' Lysistrata

TR 1:20 – 2:50 — Natoli

In this course, students will read selections of Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, one of the most hilarious works of Greek literature. Written in the late 5th century BCE, the Lysistrata chronicles the hostile takeover of Athens by Athenian women in protest of the Peloponnesian War. Highlighting this protest is the institution of a ban on sexual relations with men, an act they hope will cause the men to end the war most quickly. The aim of the class is to develop learners' Greek reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Greek 115 and 215 while introducing learners to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Greek vocabulary; to explore the major socio-literary questions posed by Lysistrata; and to introduce learners to basic professional activities of Classicists.

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