Courses

Course Offerings

The Classics Department offers a wide variety of courses through which learners can explore the Greco-Roman world. Courses are divided into three groupings: Classics in English (CLAS), Classics in Latin (LATN), and Classics in Greek (GREK). To see the course descriptions of offerings in a particular semester, select the semester from the menu on the left of the screen. If you would like to browse all Classics offerings or are looking for a particular class, try the following links:


Classics in English (CLAS)

CLAS 200 – Proseminar

Staff

Introductory undergraduate proseminar on the study of the ancient Greco–Roman world. This is an introduction to research tools and methods used in scholarship about the ancient world. It is designed to enable Latin, Greek, and Classical Studies majors to access the principal resources available for the study of language, literature, history, art history, and archaeology and to produce competent research projects in upper level courses and independent projects in all areas of classical studies. It should be taken in conjunction with the student’s second upper level language course or equivalent CLAS, HIST, or ARTH course no later than the junior year since the exercises in this proseminar will be tied to an assignment in those courses. One hour.


CLAS/FLET 201 — Ancient Epics

Staff

This course is an exploration of three of the foundational texts of Western civilization: the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Aeneid. These three works provide the perfect gateway for exploring the culture of antiquity and for investigating our own with a more critical eye. The aim of this course is to develop an understanding and appreciation of these two epics as works of literature; to analyze the circumstances and controversies surrounding their composition; and to deconstruct the socio–cultural issues presented by these works, including their relationship to contemporary ideas. Three hours


CLAS/FLET 202 — Ancient Tragedy

Staff

Readings in English translation of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Seneca. Special attention will be given to origins and development, literary and scenic conventions, and the influence of the genre on Western literature. Three hours.


CLAS/FLET 203 — Ancient Comedy

Staff

Readings in English translation of the comedies of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, and Terence. Special attention will be given to origins and development, literary and scenic conventions, and the influence of the genre on Western literature. Offered alternate years. Three hours.


CLAS/FLET 205 — Women in Antiquity

Natoli

Although almost all of Greek and Roman literature was written by men, many works treat or concern women, sometimes as realistic figures but more often as symbols. This course will examine the image of women in classical literature from Archaic Greece to Imperial Rome. For purposes of comparison and discussion, the social and historical realities will be considered as well. Cross-listed with FLET 205. Offered every three years. Three hours.


CLAS/ARTH 210 – Origins of Civilization

Fisher

When did civilization begin? How do we define civilization? How do we know when civilization has occurred and when it has ended? Why is civilization important to humans? What is the role of the arts in defining a civilization? In this course we will look at the development of early cultures and “civilizations”. We will compare definitions of civilization and the processes by which a civilization develops and wanes. Satisties part of the Civilizations AOK requirement as HIST101. Three hours.


CLAS/ARTH 211 – Art and Archaeology of Egypt and the Ancient Near East

Fisher

A survey of the sites and art of Egypt and the various cultures of the Near East from the neolithic period until the Arab conquest. Three hours.


CLAS/ARTH 212 – Prehistoric Aegean Cultures

Fisher

The Cycladic, Minoan, and Mycenaean cultures of the Bronze Age Aegean flourished for two thousand years and are often considered the earliest manifestation of civilization in Europe. This course looks at the art, monuments, and social structures of these cultures, along with the classical Greek mythology about the Age of Heroes with the myth/history of the Trojan War. Illustrated lectures with seminar sessions. Offered every three years. Three hours.


CLAS/ARTH 213— Greek Art and Archaeology

Camp

This course covers the art and archaeology of Greece from the Bronze Age through the Archaic, Classical, and early Hellenistic periods. The emphasis will be on the legacy of the Greek civilization to Western art, city planning, and thought. Illustrated lectures. Three hours.


CLAS/ARTH 214 — Bronze and Iron Age Europe

Fisher and Camp

This course covers the art and archaeology of the Neolithic through Iron Age cultures in Europe, with special emphasis on the Celts, Villanovans, and Etruscans. Also included is a survey of European and Asian cultures in contact with Bronze and Iron Age Europe, including the Greeks, Phoenicians, and Romans. We will end with a brief look at the later European Iron Age, particularly the Vikings of northern Europe. Three hours.


CLAS/ARTH 215 — Roman Art

Fisher

The Roman genius for art, as for many aspects of their civilization, was in the adaptation and originality with which they transformed borrowed ideas. This course begins with the Greek, Etruscan, and Latin origins of Roman Art, then examines the changes and innovations in art through the Roman Empire. Archaeological discoveries throughout the Mediterranean, especially Pompeii and Herculaneum, are highlighted. Illustrated lectures. Offered every three years. Three hours.


CLAS/ARTH 216 – Art of the Great Empires of Rome and Byzantium

Fisher

Christian art began within the artistic traditions of the Classical world, but the prestige of the Church transformed and transmitted the ancient modes throughout medieval Europe and the Byzantine Empire. This course looks at art from the rise of Christianity to the fall of Constantinople in AD 1453. Illustrated lectures. Offered every three years. Three hours.


CLAS/ARTH 217 – The Art and Architecture of Ancient Athletic Games

Camp

The origins of organized athletics and many of the events still practiced today can be traced back to classical Greece and Rome. This course will primarily be a survey of the artistic representations, the architectural context, and the archaeological evidence for these games. It will also be a historical survey of Greek and Roman athletics including such topics as their role in ancient military and religious life; sits and facilities; events; training and professionalism; and status, rewards, and prizes. Vase paintings, sculptures, and written texts will be examined for the light they shed on ancient athletics and the original Olympic Games. Three hours.


CLAS/ARTH 219 – Images of Women in Ancient Art

Fisher

This course is a survey of art, from the Paleolithic until the Renaissance, with a speical emphasis on images of women in various roles, particularly motherhood. All early cultures (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Classical Greece and Rome, Byzantium, and Renaissance Italy) have produced images of women for diverse reasons: from fertility symbols to icons of religious belief, from symbols of beauty and lust to icons of purity and chastity. The course will survey these images as they reflect both the style of art and the role of women in the cultures and time periods. The visual images will be supplemented by brief selections from contemporaneous literature. Offered every three years. Three hours.


CLAS/ARTH 221 – Archaeological Methods and Theory

Fisher

Archaeology is the study of the human past through material remains. Why are we intrigued by archaeology? Whose interests are served by archaeology? This course introduces the theory, methods, and ethical issues of archaeology. Topics include the responsibilities of the archaeologist, stewardship of cultural remains, and tasks such as site identification, sutvey, excavation, and artifact conservation. Special emphasis is on applied sciences such as archaeological chemistry, bioarchaeology, geoarchaeology, and archaeometry which provide analyses of artifacts primarily for the purposes of finding dates and provenances. The course does not focus on specific cultures or past discoveries; the methods and approaches presented here are widely used by archaeologists in all areas of the world. This course involves field work, and has a laboratory component. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement as a natural science with laboratory. Offered alternate years. Four hours.


CLAS/ARTH 222 – Archaeology of Israel

Fisher and Camp

The history of Israel spans all of human history: the Paleolithic burials in the Carmel Caves, early farming settlements at Ohalo II and Ain Mallaha, the Bronze Age sites of the Phillistines, the Iron Age City of David, Hellenistic Greek remains from the period of the Maccbean Revolt, Roman aqueducts and cemeteries, the Jewish fortress at Masada, early Christian churches, monuments of the early Islamic period such as the Dome of the Rock, and the castles of European crusaders. This course will survey the archaeology of Israel, and will consider how the archaeological record supplements and contradicts the written histories of a land claimed and contested by numerous ethnic and religious populations over the centuries. Israel's place in the Roman world with be highlighted. Three hours.


CLAS 223 — Classical Mythology

Natoli

Athena. Hercules. Odysseus. Despite their chronological distance from us, the characters and tales of Greco-Roman mythology are quite familiar and have been profoundly influential in shaping Western culture, inspiring everything from art and literature, to notions of sexuality and gender, to the themes of Hollywood blockbusters. In this course, learners will be introduced to the major Greco-Roman myths and will consider questions about the universal and not-so-universal sides of stories about gods, heroes, and humans that expressed important messages about cultural values and individual fears, about our interior human world and the often greater-than-human forces and impulses that act upon us. Three hours.


CLAS 224 – Ancient Cult and Worship

Daugherty

A survey of the principal religions of antiquity and their role in shaping the intellectual climate as well as the political institutions and social convetions of Greco-Roman society. Various Near Eastern religions and Christian sects will be studied for background and comparison. Offered alternate years. Three hours.


CLAS 225 — Roman Daily Life

Daugherty

What did it mean to be a Roman? By looking at both the physical and literary remains, this course will survey the basic structures of Roman Society, the typical urban and rural monuments of the Latin–speaking world, and the intimate details of the daily lives of individuals and families. Three hours. Three hours.


CLAS/HIST 226 – Warfare in Antiquity

Fisher

Most of Ancient History is military history, and much of Greek and Roman art and literature treats wars, warriors and their impact on society. This course will examine the practice of warfare in the Greek Polis, the Macedonian Kingdoms, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire. Themes include the technical aspects (logistics, intelligence, strategy, naval warfare, and armor), but we will also examine the literary and artistic interpretations of war and the sociological and psychological aspects. No prior knowledge of military history or Greco/Roman history expected or required. Offered alternate years. Three hours.


CLAS/WMST 227 — Ancient Sexualities

Natoli

Systems of sexuality and gender in ancient Greece and Rome were very different from our own. The aim of this course is to explore the cultural construction of sexuality and gender in ancient Greece and Rome, approaching them through their depictions in the archaeological and literary record. We will consider questions such as the status of women and the context of misogyny, the multiple manners in which masculinity was constructed, the societal role of same-sex relations, the presentation and visualization of sexuality, desire, and the body. This interdisciplinary approach will allow us to gain an understanding of what Greek and Roman systems of sexuality and gender were, how they changed over time, and how they can be used to offer insights into the shaping of our own cultural and personal attitudes towards sexuality and gender. Three hours. Counts towards the Social Science AOK, WMST major or minor, and CLAS major or minor.


CLAS/HIST 303 – Roman Britain

Daugherty

An interdisciplinary survey of the Roman occupation of the British Isles based on readings of the historical sources in translation, study of modern analyses, and close examination of the arachaeological and artistic remains. When taught in England, the course includes frequent visits to museums and Roman and Celtic sites. Offered alternate years. Three hours.


CLAS/HIST 311 – Greek History

Daugherty

A chronological survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of Greek history from the Minoan and Mycenaean beginnings to the period of Roman domination. Offered alternate years. Three hours.


CLAS/HIST 312 – Roman History

Daugherty

A chronological survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of Roman history from the foundations to the end of the ancient world. Three hours.


CLAS/ARCH 320 —Archaeological Ethics

Fisher

Who owns the past? Who should profit from archaeological discoveries? Where should antiquities be stored or displayed? Who should pay for the safety, conservation, and preservation of sites and artifacts? Should modern descendants have the option to prevent archaeological research aimed at their ancestors or museum exhibition of their ancestral material culture? Who should interpret the past of a culture or group of people? This course covers the current international and US laws which govern historic preservation, cultural resource management, archaeology, and commerce in antiquities; considers numerous case studies which have led to the creation of codes of ethics and professional standards for archaeologists and museums; and debates some of the diverse points of view concerning archaeological ethics and practice. Cross-listed with CLASS 320. Offered alternate years. Three hours.


CLAS 401 — Capstone

Staff

A culminating experience in which a Classics, Latin, or Greek major will integrate, extend, and apply knowledge and skills from the student’s general education and major programs. Enrollment is through a project contract which may include one of the following: student teaching in a Latin program, participation in a Classics Department Learning Community abroad, completion of a semester at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome or the College Year in Athens, participation in an approved archaeological excavation, participation in an approved internship, a departmental honors course, a research experience outside of a class (including SURF), or a significant research project completed in conjunction with a regularly scheduled major course. Prerequisites: senior status or junior status with consent of Chair. 0 hours.


CLAS/ARCH 450—Field Studies in Archaeology

Fisher

This course is an excavation, field research, or museum experience. The student will gain experience with archaeological techniques for survey, excavation, analysis, conservation, classification and recording on an approved excavation or in a museum or laboratory setting. A minimum of four weeks or 130 hours of participation in an excavation, field school, or museum program is required. If a student participates during the summer in an excavation or field school which is not part of the Randolph-Macon College summer session, the student should take ARCH 450 in the next term of residency at Randolph-Macon College. Permission of instructor required. Cross-listed with CLASS 450. Offered as needed. Three hours


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Classics in Latin (LATN)

LATN 111 – Elementary Latin

Staff

The essentials of Latin grammar with emphasis on forms and syntax and the reading of simple Latin prose. Three hours. By the end of Latin 111, learners will be able to:

  1. Define basic Latin vocabulary (appx. 500 words).
  2. Identify the grammatical forms of Latin words.
  3. Identify the syntactical functions of Latin words.
  4. Analyze the syntax of a Latin sentence.
  5. Use different strategies to translate Latin.

Class time will be devoted to discussion of and practice with Latin grammatical and syntactical topics. There will also be regular class discussions of the historical and literary contexts of Latin, with special emphasis paid to topics of learner interest. Learners should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as weekly quizzes. Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; homework; quizzes; and a final exam.


LATN 112 — Elementary Latin II

Staff

Further study of Latin grammar and the reading of selections of prose and poetry. Prerequisite: LATN 111 or pre-placement. Three hours. By the end of Latin 112, learners will be able to:

  1. Define basic Latin vocabulary (appx. 1000 words).
  2. Identify the grammatical forms of Latin words.
  3. Identify the syntactical functions of Latin words.
  4. Analyze the syntax of a Latin sentence.
  5. Use different strategies to translate Latin.

Class time will be devoted to discussion of and practice with Latin grammatical and syntactical topics. There will also be regular class discussions of the historical and literary contexts of Latin, with special emphasis paid to topics of learner interest. Learners should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as weekly quizzes. Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; homework; quizzes; and a final exam.


LATN 211 – Intermediate Latin I

Staff

Practice in special reading skill required to read and translate continuous passages of Latin prose and an introduction to the reading of Latin prose as literature. Prerequisite: LATN 112 or pre-placement. Three hours.


LATN 212 — Intermediate Latin II

Staff

An introduction to reading Latin poetry, especially elegy. Prerequisite: LATN 211 or pre-placement. Three hours.


LATN 215 – Intensive Intermediate Latin

Natoli

An accelerated course which completes the collegiate requirement in foreign languages in Latin in one semester. Designed for advanced entering students who have completed four or more years of high school Latin or who have scored well on the achievement, advanced placement, or departmental screening tests. Brief review of grammar, syntax, and morphology along with concentrated reading skill development through readings in Latin prose and poetry. Admittance through placement testing only. Four hours.


LATN 341 –Roman Drama

Natoli

In this course, students will read the plays of Plautus, Terence, and Seneca. Although the majority of the class will be spent on the careful translation of the texts, the socio-political and literary issues surrounding drama will be considered. The aim of the class is to develop learners’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in LATN 115 and 215 while introducing learners to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary; to introduce learners to the socio-literary and performance contexts of Roman dramatic verse; and to introduce learners to basic professional activities of Classicists. Offered every four years. Three hours.


LATN 342 — Advanced Latin: Roman Satire

Natoli

In this course, students will read selections of Roman Satiric Verse. Although the majority of the class will be spent on Horace and Juvenal, selections from Lucilius and Persius will also be considered. The aim of the class is to develop learners' Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in LATN 115 and 215 while introducing learners to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary; to introduce learners to the socio–literary and performance contexts of Roman Satiric verse; and to introduce learners to basic professional activities of Classicists. Prerequisite: LATN 212, 215, or placement. Three hours.


LATN 343 — Advanced Latin Epic

Natoli

In this course, students will read selections from Ennius' Annales, Vergil’s Aeneid, and Lucan's Pharsalia. The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in LATN 115 and 215 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Roman Epic; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.


LATN 344 — Advanced Latin Historiography

Daugherty

Selections from Livy, Tacitus, Sallust, Caesar, or Suetonius. Prerequisite: LATN 212, 215, or placement. Offered every four years. Three hours.


LATN 345 — Advanced Latin Lyric Poetry

Natoli

Selections from Catullus and Horace. Prerequisite: LATN 212, 215, or placement. Offered every four years. Three hours.


LATN 346 – Advanced Latin: Epistles

Natoli

In this course, students will read selections of Roman Epistolography. Although the first portion of the class will be spent on identifying the literary and social contexts of Roman Epistolography through an examination of the letters of Cicero (1st c. BCE) and Pliny the Younger (1st c. CE), the bulk of the class will center on the letters of Fronto, a prominent member of the court of Emperor Marcus Aurelius (mid-late 2nd c. CE). The aim of the class is to develop learners' Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in LATN 115 and 215 while introducing learners to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary; to introduce learners to the socio-literary and performance contexts of Roman Epistolography; and to introduce learners to basic professional activities of Classicists.;


LATN 347 — Advanced Latin: Roman Elegy

Natoli

In this course, students will read selections of Roman Elegiac Verse, a unique and short-lived style of poetry in the late 1st century BCE. Although the majority of the class will be spent on Propertius and Ovid, selections from Tibullus and Sulpicia will also be considered. The aim of the class is to develop learners’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in LATN 115 and 215 while introducing learners to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary; to introduce learners to the socio-literary and performance contexts of Roman Elegiac verse; and to introduce learners to basic professional activities of Classicists.


LATN 348 – Advanced Latin: Roman Oratory

Natoli

In this course, students will read selections of Roman oratorical speeches. Although the majority of the class will be spent on Cicero’s speeches, selections from Sallust and Seneca the Elder will also be considered. The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in LATN 115 and 215 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary; to introduce students to the socio-literary and performance contexts of Roman oratory; and to teach students basic literary devices and their uses.


LATN 349 – Methods of Teaching Latin

Natoli

This course comprises a comparative study of the several approaches to the teaching of Latin and an intensive study of several skills necessary for effective classroom teaching of Latin. EDUC 220 and 3 LATN courses above 215 recommended. Permission of instructor required. Three Hours


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Classics in Greek (GREK)

GREK 111 — Elementary Greek I

Fisher

A linguistically-oriented approach to the study of the Greek language with emphasis on grammatical structure and the acquisition of an elementary reading facility. Offered every year. Three hours.


GREK 112 — Elementary Greek II

Fisher

Further practice in the grammatical structures of the Greek language with increased emphasis upon the reading of simple Greek prose. Prerequisite: GREK 111. Offered every year. Three hours.


GREK 215 — Intensive Intermediate Greek

Fisher

An accelerated course which completes the collegiate requirement in foreign languages in ancient Greek, and prepares students to take advanced courses in Classical and Koine Greek. Brief review of grammar, syntax, and morphology, along with concentrated reading skill development and intensive vocabulary study through readings in Classical and New Testament Greek. Prerequisite: GREK 112 or a placement by department. Offered every fall. Four hours.


GREK 341: The Greek Epic

Daugherty

Selected readings from the Iliad and Odyssey of Homer. Prerequisite: GREK 212 or 215. Offered every other year. Three hours. Staff.


GREK 344: Greek Historiography

Daugherty

Selections from Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, or Polybius. Prerequisite: GREK 212 or 215. Offered every other year. Three hours. Staff.


GREK 345: Greek Philosophical Prose

Staff

Selections from Plato, Aristotle, and their successors. Prerequisite: GREK 212 or 215. Offered every other year. Three hours. Staff.


GREK 346: Greek New Testament

Daugherty

Selections from the Gospels and the Pauline letters with special emphasis on problems of exegesis and historical criticism. Prerequisite: GREK 212 or 215. Offered every other year.Three hours. Staff.

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