Honors Courses - Before Fall 2016

Recent Honors Courses 

2017-2018 Courses

Fall 2017

Higher Ed and the Liberal Arts and Your Place in College (HONR 201) - (Required for all incoming freshmen honors students, fall 2017.  Required course for students entering Fall 2016 and after.) This course will focus on contextualizing the college experience through an examination the history of higher education in this country and the mission and values of the liberal arts (the cornerstone of a Randolph-Macon education). The work in this course encourages students to explore the difficult questions about their place in the culture of higher education: what are our own privileges or disadvantages in this environment? What responsibilities does the student have to our community, particularly as someone who has been chosen for an elite academic program? What plans can the student make to ensure that you are making the most of the college experience? What does it mean to extend the lessons of the college experience into the “real world”? This seminar-style discussion based course focuses on the cultivation of careful, critical reading skills and the development of familiarity with the process of true intellectual inquiry through a solution’s based exploration of salient questions and the formulation of theories.  The work in this course culminates in a reflective portfolio of the students first year’s work.  Fulfills the first-year Honors requirement. One hour. Honors Fellow. 

The Key of Remembrance (HONR 112)

Why do we remember one thing and forget another?  Why are our earliest memories so different from those of our teenage years and early adulthood? Why can a song or an odor transport us back in time to a vivid recollection? How does a memory change when written as a narrative?   We’ll take up these questions in our study of autobiographical writing and its history, key components of memory, and a variety of memoirs. Students will each write a memoir that draws on different kinds of memories.  Classes will be divided among writing workshops and discussion of memoirs and theoretical and critical works on memory and autobiographical writing.  AOK: Literature.  A. Goodwin.

Heroes or Villains: A Forensic Journey in the world of the famous Odysseus (HONR 103)

Using Odysseus as case study, this course will introduce students to an attentive analysis of a varied array of ancient and modern sources (Homer, Plato, Cicero, Ovid, Seneca, Statius, Dante, Tennyson, Joyce, Shay – to mention a few) to engage them in a quest aimed at uncovering the real identity of this hero, and at prompting reflection on a concept that is often turned into a meaningless and empty label. Students will discover and redefine who heroes were in the past, and who they are presently. Undertaking a forensic journey in the world of Odysseus, students will learn to deconstruct the personality of Odysseus, which – as they will find out – embodies issues and struggles that are typical to human nature, are timeless, and thus relevant to our present days. The course will thus take the shape of a discovery-journey among deep concerns about the human condition, via portraits of this hero. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the Arts and Literature (literature) and counts on the major or minor in Classics. Three hours.

The Art of Facilitation (HONR 117)

Facilitators are people who guide groups through difficult discussions, dialogues, or decisions. Students who complete this course will understand the interdisciplinary art of facilitation from a scholarly perspective, and they will be able to perform in the role of an effective facilitator. Effective facilitation is informed by interdisciplinary research and has countless applications: classroom teaching, conflict mediation, international diplomacy, organizational leadership, group counseling, community development, and social justice education. Scholars emphasize that effective facilitation is not a matter of simple skill acquisition, rather it is an art that involves self-awareness, understanding of participants, design of processes, and post-practice reflection.  Partially fulfills the Areas of Knowledge (AOK): Social Science requirement. The course will also count in the communication skills component of the Communication Studies major and minor: in the 2nd bullet point under the second component for the major and in the 2nd bullet point ("Must complete one of the following courses: ...") for the minor -- but only for students not affected by a change in the COMM minor, to become effective in the 2017-2018 Academic Catalog, that eliminates the current second bullet point in the description of the minor.

 

January, 2018

Don Quijote (HONR 228)

This course will focus on Miguel de Cervantes’ best-selling novel Don Quijote de la Mancha. This novel is not only Cervantes’ best-known work, but is considered one of the great masterpieces of world literature, and the work’s eponymous protagonist is one of the most famous of all literary creations. The novel will be studied to appreciate the character of Don Quijote, to understand the plot itself and to examine the creativity of its writer, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. In addition to viewing Cervantes’ commentaries on Spanish society of the early 17th century and its moral fabric, we will also pay particular attention to the role of reading and writing as portrayed in the novel. We will also look at some central themes of the novel such as the complex relation between fiction and reality, the psychology of Don Quijote as we appreciate the often ribald and scatological humor of the novel. El Quijote is a novel that can be studied for a lifetime, and one to and from which every reader will bring their own experience. This course will also emphasize the importance for each student to reflect on his or her own reading experiences. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in Arts and Literature (literature). Three hours.  M. Malin

 

Holy Hikes: Pilgrimage in History (HONR 118)

Medieval Europe was a patchwork of sacred sites to which pilgrims travelled for spiritual and physical benefits. The idea of a pilgrimage was that in the act of moving, one would ultimately be spiritually moved. The longer and more difficult the journey, the greater the earthly and heavenly benefits. The value of pilgrimage was heavily contested during Reformation Europe with Protestant reformers claiming it was of greater spiritual value to stay at home and tend to one’s responsibilities. Sacred pilgrimage exists today but so too do secular sojourns. In this class, we will examine the history of pilgrimage, practices associated with it, controversies surrounding it and its modern manifestations. Three hours.  AOK: Civilizations (HIST 100).  A. Throckmorton

 

Holy Hikes: Pilgrimage in Literature (HONR 119)

Pilgrimage is a cross-cultural practice shared by people the world over. Some would distinguish secular from sacred pilgrimage, but one might also argue that all pilgrimage is, by its nature, sacred. Travel to a specific destination because it is that destination implicitly sacralizes it. In this course we will examine texts about pilgrimage and pilgrimage as text.  Three hours.  Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in Arts and Literature (literature). M. Scott

 

Spring, 2018

Collaborative Problem Solving (HONR 202)--offered as HONR 281 in spring, 2018

(Required course for students entering fall 2016 and after.) The Honors Program at R-MC is designed to offer a unique educational experience to our most outstanding students. In the spring semester of your sophomore year, your work in Honors 202 will focus on the fundamentals of Problem- or Project-Based Learning and how to work collaboratively in teams to design a Collaborative Learning Experience Project that will be carried out in HONR 300, a three-hour course, either the fall semester or the January term following the completion of HONR 202.  In preparation for completing your project in HONR 300, you will hone skills such as creative inquiry, collaboration (how to work effectively in group situations to solve problems), and problem solving. Working collaboratively with a HONR 300 faculty and your group members, you will establish meaningful outcome goals for the group project. You will structure a research plan that examines the particular problem from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Your collaborative work in HONR 202 will result in a formal proposal that will be reviewed and ultimately approved by the course instructors and other members of the College Honors Council.

 

Dirt, Immunity, and Cancer (HONR 279)

Immune disorders, including allergy and asthma, are on the rise in developed nations. What is it about the Westernized lifestyle that increases the risk of immune disorders? Research has indicated that children who are kept in very clean environments have a higher rate of hay fever, asthma and other immune disorders. Could the increased prevalence of allergy and asthma in developed nations be a side effect of too much cleanliness? Is dirt actually good for us?  This course will examine the evidence surrounding the hygiene hypothesis, which links cleanliness and a variety of immune disorders.  To best evaluate the hypothesis, we will first learn a bit about cellular and molecular biology.  We will then narrow our focus to understanding how the immune system functions during healthy responses against harmful pathogens as well as inappropriate responses against harmless triggers, such as pollen or peanuts. Students will then apply this knowledge to understand how the environment (i.e. dirt, or lack thereof) impacts the immune system.  Finally, this course will explore how lessons from the hygiene hypothesis have informed cancer treatments, including the “dirt vaccine” and other immunotherapies.  NOTE: This course is not open to students who have passed BIOL 133. Partially fills the Area of Knowledge in Lab Sciences.  (Science course, no Lab)  M. Gubbels-Bupp

 

Road Trip! Going Places in American Literature (HONR 116)

Road trips are an American experience. Stretching from the early colonial settlers to the counter-cultural beatniks of the 1960s and beyond, the road trip speaks to the American desire to journey outward, into to new frontiers. Through literary texts from a variety of periods and genres, this course explores the road trip as a central cultural metaphor that reflects issues of self-development, national identity, and modernization. Examining the road trip thus provides an inroad into the American imagination itself. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in Arts and Literature (literature). Three hours.  B. Volpicelli

 

How Did They Do That? Chemistry and Art in the Ancient World (HONR 120)

This course will chart the parallel developments in Chemistry and in Art in the Ancient World.  Students will recreate the ancient manufacturing techniques in the laboratory and rationalize the experiments with a modern, scientific understanding of the underlying chemistry. Students will make fire, make charcoal sticks, smelt copper, mold and fire clays, glaze ceramics, manufacture glass, prepare pigments, mold plaster, press papyrus and paper, prepare inks, spin fibers, extract potash, dye fabrics, and paint frescoes. Six hours integrated lab and lecture per week. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the Natural Sciences with Lab. Concurrent enrollment in or previous completion of ARTH 210 / CLAS 210 (Origins of Civilization) strongly recommended. Four credit hours. J. Thoburn.

 

 

2016-2017 Courses

Fall 2016

Six Wives of Henry VIII (HONR 283)

Henry VIII looms large in history—literally and figuratively. Much of the reason for his stature stems from the many women he married, two of whom he discarded quite violently. Who were these supporting players in the life of this charismatic and Janus-faced king? During this course we will explore the lives of Katherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Katherine Howard, and Katherine Parr who shared the same husband but who were remarkable individuals in their own right. While analyzing these women, we will also investigate how they each in their own way breached the traditional boundaries that limited women's lives during the early modern period, In addition to reading scholarly biographies of these women and their irascible and dangerous husband, we will explore fictional treatments of this remarkably dysfunctional family in literature and film. Three hours. A. Throckmorton

The Key of Remembrance (HONR  112)

Why do we remember one thing and forget another?  Why are our earliest memories so different from those of our teenage years and early adulthood? Why can a song or an odor transport us back in time to a vivid recollection? How does a memory change when written as a narrative?   We’ll take up these questions in our study of autobiographical writing and its history, key components of memory, and a variety of memoirs. Students will each write a memoir that draws on different kinds of memories.  Classes will be divided among writing workshops and discussion of memoirs and theoretical and critical works on memory and autobiographical writing.  AOK: Literature.  A. Goodwin.

Philosophy of Education (HONR 262)

We will read and discuss classic and contemporary works in the philosophy of education, and recent news articles spotlighting pressing questions in education today. We will consider questions such as the roles of teaching authority and student autonomy, the education of values and desires as compared with skills and information, and the opportunities and dangers of disciplinary specialization. Students will reflect on their own experiences in education, and develop their views as to what sort of education they should pursue for themselves. They will also develop and argue for their views on what kind of education is best to build a healthy, flourishing society. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in civilizations (philosophy and religion) and the cross area requirement in Western culture and multidisciplinary courses, partially fulfills the philosophy and religion requirement under the old curriculum, and counts on the philosophy major and minor. Three hours. B. Huff.

January 2017

Monsters and Modernism (HONR 255)

Monsters and Modernism, or “Who are you calling weird?” focuses on the human fascination with otherness that can be traced back to ancient Greece and the Cyclops in Homer’s Iliad and other mythical half-human monsters, and even earlier to the allegorical tales of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. Modern otherness is highlighted in the debates surrounding identity politics—the civil rights, feminist, and in particular, the disability rights movements. This course considers the various theories and methods that social scientists employ to examine identity (including lengthy conversations about postmodernism and alternative epistemologies) in an attempt to better understand how normalcy is socially determined. The examination will include a closer look at popular culture, and specifically how disability and other differences amongst individuals are portrayed in film, television, print media, etc. Students will be expected to read and disseminate a wide variety of sources, write several substantive papers responding to major class themes, and engage in regular Socratic dialog during class meetings and the small groups that will meet. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the social sciences (sociology), counts as a multidisciplinary course toward the Cross Area Requirements, and counts on the sociology major or minor in group 4. Three hours. Mr. Trammell.

Introduction to the Fairy Tale (HONR 150)

Fairy tales have fed man’s imagination for centuries. Yet they are a narrative form that traditionally received relatively little attention from critics. Within the last ten years, however, the fairy tales have come into their own as an object of serious study. It is the purpose of this course to introduce students to the study of fairy tales, their origin, meaning, and evolution. The course will begin with a look at different origin theories. We will then study and apply a variety of theories of interpretation, mythological, historical, psychological, and feminist to a number of well-known tales. The course will close with a look at the way fairy tales continue to appear in contemporary culture, taking on new meaning as they adapt to new cultural norms. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in Arts and Literature (literature). Three hours.  Prof. A. deGraff

Spring 2017

Introduction to 3D Modeling and Printing (HONR 111)

3D printing is an additive manufacturing process whereby objects are built up from plastic filament, liquid resin, layers of powder, or other materials. Desktop 3D printing is today’s printing press, putting rapid prototyping and individualized products in reach of the general public. Literacy in basic 3D modeling and manufacturing is an essential skill for future STEM success in this country. In this course students will learn how to be “makers” by using various types of 3D modeling software, and printing actual physical objects that they have designed and modeled themselves. Mathematical principles from computational geometry will be developed and applied throughout the course.  AOK: Natural, Math, or Computer Science without lab; CAR: Computing.  B. Torrence

The Mathematics of Money (HONR 113)

The mathematics of money and personal finance.  Inflation, interest, and the role of central banks. Mathematics of savings, loans, and annuities with fixed interest rates. Models for fluctuating interest rates and forecasting for common investment strategies and financial obligations. A brief look at the stock market.  AOK: Natural and Math Sciences Three hours.  B. Sutton.

Religion & the Founding Fathers (HONR 289)

An examination of the religious beliefs and practices of America's Founding Fathers and the impact of religion on the creation and early years of the United States. We will consider the Founders’ views of religion, learn about their understanding of the relationship between religion and other areas of life, and study their personal faiths. We will also focus on the Founders’ conceptions of deity, humanity, morality, and history and examine various ways these influenced their understanding of America, its peoples, and their views of the roles, purposes, and forms of government. In addition, we will reflect on the significance of religion and the Founding Fathers for contemporary America. AOK: Religion; Area Three in the Religious Studies curriculum: Religion and Culture. Three hours. E. H. Breitenberg.

Food for Thought: Food and Politics in American Art and Culture from the Colonial Period to the 1960s.  (HONR 115)

Food, its production, availability, variety, and consumption is ubiquitously present in American art and culture. American artists have recorded the complex and broad cultural implications of foodstuff in the United States, from the lush still-lifes of the nineteenth century, to the pristine, technologically produced canned foods of the twentieth century.  The course will explore the socio-cultural and political underpinnings of food in American visual culture, with particular emphasis on the depictions of food in both high art, such as paintings and photographs, but also in low art prints, advertisements and food packaging.  Conversations will focus on food symbolism, racial and economic stereotyping, practices of production and labor, provision and circulation of food stuff, excess or deprivation at various historical moments, and issues of gender, race and social status, as relative to food production and consumption. Partially fulfills the AOK requirement in Arts and Literature (arts), counts on the major or minor for Art History.  Three hours.  Professor E. Terrono.

Heroes or Villains: A Forensic Journey in the world of the famous Odysseus (HONR 103)

Using Odysseus as case study, this course will introduce students to an attentive analysis of a varied array of ancient and modern sources (Homer, Plato, Cicero, Ovid, Seneca, Statius, Dante, Tennyson, Joyce, Shay – to mention a few) to engage them in a quest aimed at uncovering the real identity of this hero, and at prompting reflection on a concept that is often turned into a meaningless and empty label. Students will discover and redefine who heroes were in the past, and who they are presently. Undertaking a forensic journey in the world of Odysseus, students will learn to deconstruct the personality of Odysseus which – as they will find out – embodies issues and struggles that are typical to human nature, are timeless, and thus relevant to our present days. The course will thus take the shape of a discovery-journey among deep concerns about the human condition, via portraits of this hero. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the Arts and Literature (literature) and counts on the major or minor in Classics. Three hours.  Prof. R. Lauriola

 

2015 - 2016 Courses

Spring 2016

Introduction to the Fairy Tale (HONR 150)

Fairy tales have fed man’s imagination for centuries. Yet they are a narrative form that traditionally received relatively little attention from critics. Within the last ten years, however, the fairy tales have come into their own as an object of serious study. It is the purpose of this course to introduce students to the study of fairy tales, their origin, meaning, and evolution. The course will begin with a look at different origin theories. We will then study and apply a variety of theories of interpretation, mythological, historical, psychological, and feminist to a number of well-known tales. The course will close with a look at the way fairy tales continue to appear in contemporary culture, taking on new meaning as they adapt to new cultural norms. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in Arts and Literature (literature). Three hours.

The Nobel Vision: U.S. Nobel Laureates in Literature (HONR 109)

Although very little links U.S. Nobel Laureates in literature in terms of style, characters or setting, these authors, (including Toni Morrison, Sinclair Lewis and Ernest Hemingway) succeed in crafting historical U.S. archives. Through her focus on their marginalized personhood, Toni Morrison magnifies the life and culture of African Americans; through his focus on Southern culture and tradition, William Faulkner features a tradition-laden South resistant to inevitable change; and through his minimalist style and stoic characters, Ernest Hemingway addresses essential ideas of both U.S. and world Modernism. This course seeks to address each of these, and other writers’, sui generis themes and understanding of very specific, yet different, kinds of “American” identities. Through a focus on certain periods in history, including the Civil Rights Era and the Great Depression, students will come to a greater understanding of the literary and cultural US landscape. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in Arts and Literature (literature) and counts on the major or minor in English. Three hours.

January 2016

Zen & Creativity/Permission Required (HONR 215)

This course investigates the connections between the Buddhist concept of Zen and the notion of creativity commonly used by visual and conceptual artists. Students study meditation techniques and other physical/mental strategies to accomplish artistic and expressive work. Includes trip to Zen Mountain Monastery in upstate New York. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in Arts and Literature (arts). Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Must also enroll in PHED101.14 (Zazen Meditation). Three hours.

Don Quijote (HONR 228)

This course will focus on Miguel de Cervantes’ best-selling novel Don Quijote de la Mancha. This novel is not only Cervantes’ best-known work, but is considered one of the great masterpieces of world literature, and the work’s eponymous protagonist is one of the most famous of all literary creations. The novel will be studied to appreciate the character of Don Quijote, to understand the plot itself and to examine the creativity of its writer, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. In addition to viewing Cervantes’ commentaries on Spanish society of the early 17th century and its moral fabric, we will also pay particular attention to the role of reading and writing as portrayed in the novel. We will also look at some central themes of the novel such as the complex relation between fiction and reality, the psychology of Don Quijote as we appreciate the often ribald and scatological humor of the novel. El Quijote is a novel that can be studied for a lifetime, and one to and from which every reader will bring their own experience. This course will also emphasize the importance for each student to reflect on his or her own reading experiences. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in Arts and Literature (literature). Three hours.

Homer and Hollywood: The Iliad and the Odyssey in Film (HONR 243)

The Iliad and the Odyssey of Homer are classics of Greek and Western literature and have had an enormous impact on high culture in the lofty reaches of great art, music, literature and performance. They deserve such a position and every educated person should learn how to read, comprehend and profit from them. They were also extremely popular and accessible throughout antiquity, and were enjoyed in their own right as smashing good yarns, riveting stories and entrancing performance pieces. This course will not only read and examine all of both works and place them in their appropriate context as literature of the heroic, oral and tragic traditions, but will also explore their themes and images as pop culture entertainment – both then and now by examining several films which attempted to either tell the same story or used the themes and plots of the epics in different contexts. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in Arts and Literature (arts) and counts on the major or minor in Classics. Four hours.

Fall 2015

Heroes or Villains: A Forensic Journey in the world of the famous Odysseus (HONR 103)

Using Odysseus as case study, this course will introduce students to an attentive analysis of a varied array of ancient and modern sources (Homer, Plato, Cicero, Ovid, Seneca, Statius, Dante, Tennyson, Joyce, Shay – to mention a few) to engage them in a quest aimed at uncovering the real identity of this hero, and at prompting reflection on a concept that is often turned into a meaningless and empty label. Students will discover and redefine who heroes were in the past, and who they are presently. Undertaking a forensic journey in the world of Odysseus, students will learn to deconstruct the personality of Odysseus which – as they will find out – embodies issues and struggles that are typical to human nature, are timeless, and thus relevant to our present days. The course will thus take the shape of a discovery-journey among deep concerns about the human condition, via portraits of this hero. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the Arts and Literature (literature) and counts on the major or minor in Classics. Three hours.

Minding Psychology – Service Learning(HONR 104)

This class examines how the discipline of psychology constructs the concept of difference from traditional views of human nature. We will also challenge these views of human nature with our experiences in an ongoing service project. We will examine the issue of difference using texts, films, journals, essays, exams, and community service. Challenge what you are learning hand’s on while you serve local citizens with disabilities. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the Social Sciences (psychology) and counts on the major or minor in Psychology. Three hours.

Minding Philosophy – Service Learning(HONR 105)

This class examines how the discipline of philosophy constructs the concept of difference from traditional views of human nature. Topics include: personal identity, individualism, gender, disability, free will, truth and reality. We will also challenge these views of human nature with our experiences in an ongoing service project. We will examine the issue of difference using texts, films, journals, essays, exams, and community service. Challenge what you are learning hand’s on while you serve local citizens with disabilities. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in Philosophy and Religion. Three hours.

Our Green Allies: The Plant-Human Relationship (HONR 106)

This course will explore the connections that humans have with plants, and how this relationship has progressed historically. Countless aspects of our economy and culture are dependent upon plant-derived products despite our tendency to overlook this interdependency. As a class, we will explore how plants are essential as sources of medicine, food, fuel, infrastructure, and a connection to nature. Students will learn about the plant body and how we manipulate certain physiological aspects for our usage. Lecture/laboratory periods will be spent discussing readings on these themes as well as conducting hands-on exercises, and field trips will be taken to local places and habitats of interest to support the material. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the Natural Sciences (biology). Two three-hour lecture/laboratory sessions per week. Four hours.

Mortality and Memorialization in Literature (HONR 107)

Death and dying are components of life and living that constitute a crisis for society, for groups, and for the individuals and, thus, engender cultural as well as person- al responses. Each of us confronts, accepts, or denies death and/or dying as an individual, as a member of a group or groups, and as a member of society and global community. This course explores the social, mythological, and spiritual implications of mortality and literary and artistic responses to it, including personal and corporate practices of memorialization. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in Arts and Literature (literature) and counts on the major or minor in English. Three hours.

2014 - 2015 Courses

Spring 2015

Introduction to the Fairy Tale (HONR 150 01)

Fairy tales have fed man’s imagination for centuries. Yet they are a narrative form that traditionally received relatively little attention from critics. Within the last ten years, however, the fairy tales have come into their own as an object of serious study. It is the purpose of this course to introduce students to the study of fairy tales, their origin, meaning, and evolution. The course will begin with a look at different origin theories. We will then study and apply a variety of theories of interpretation, mythological, historical, psychological, and feminist to a number of well-known tales. The course will close with a look at the way fairy tales continue to appear in contemporary culture, taking on new meaning as they adapt to new cultural norms. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature). Three hours. A. DeGraff.

Homeland Security (HONR 247)

The events of September 11th have left deep scars on the American psyche. It is almost inconceivable that the actions of so few men could change the lives of so many. Fourteen months after 9/11, on November 25th, 2002 President George Bush signed into law the Homeland Security Act of 2002. In the most comprehensive reorganization of the nations' security apparatus since the passage of the National Security Act of 1947, a new Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was created. This ongoing reorganization encompasses at least 22 existing federal agencies and impacts as many as 180,000 employees. In its efforts to consolidate the nations' response capabilities to disasters and emergencies, the Bush administration has created a new superbureaucracy eclipsed only by the existing Department of Defense. This course explores the U.S. response to domestic and foreign terrorism. Topics covered include, the origins and cause of political violence, the role of the federal government in homeland security, the impact on state and local governments, the impact on civil rights and civil liberties and present and future threats to U.S. security. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in social science and counts on the major in Political Science. Three hours. T. Badey.

Religion & the Founding Fathers (HONR 289)

An examination of the religious beliefs and practices of America's Founding Fathers and the impact of religion on the creation and early years of the United States. We will consider the Founders’ views of religion, learn about their understanding of the relationship between religion and other areas of life, and study their personal faiths. We will also focus on the Founders’ conceptions of deity, humanity, morality, and history and examine various ways these influenced their understanding of America, its peoples, and their views of the roles, purposes, and forms of government. In addition, we will reflect on the significance of religion and the Founding Fathers for contemporary America. Area Three in the Religious Studies curriculum: Religion and Culture. Three hours. E. H. Breitenberg.

Ancient Sexuality (HONR 299)

Systems of sexuality and gender in ancient Greece and Rome were very different from our own. The aim of this course is to explore the cultural construction of sexuality and gender in ancient Greece and Rome, approaching them through their depictions in the archaeological and literary record. We will consider questions such as the status of women and the context of misogyny, the multiple manners in which masculinity was constructed, the societal role of same-sex relations, the presentation and visualization of sexuality, desire, and the body. This interdisciplinary approach will allow us to gain an understanding of what Greek and Roman systems of sexuality and gender were, how they changed over time, and how they can be used to offer insights into the shaping of our own cultural and personal attitudes towards sexuality and gender. Counts towards the Social Science AOK, WMST major or minor, and CLAS major or minor. Three hours. B. Natoli.

January 2015

Philosophy of Education (HONR 262)

We will read and discuss classic and contemporary works in the philosophy of education, and recent news articles spotlighting pressing questions in education today. We will consider questions such as the roles of teaching authority and student autonomy, the education of values and desires as compared with skills and information, and the opportunities and dangers of disciplinary specialization. Students will reflect on their own experiences in education, and develop their views as to what sort of education they should pursue for themselves. They will also develop and argue for their views on what kind of education is best to build a healthy, flourishing society. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in civilizations (philosophy and religion) and the cross area requirement in Western culture and multidisciplinary courses, partially fulfills the philosophy and religion requirement under the old curriculum, and counts on the philosophy major and minor. Three hours. B. Huff.

Lysistrata in LaLa Land: Aristophanic Comedy in Greece and Hollywood (HONR 263)

The plays of Aristophanes are the oldest comic dramas in existence today. All other comic dramas are, in some sense, descendants of these plays. This course will study both Aristophanes' plays and American film comedies which most clearly maintain the Aristophanic traditions. We will read all the plays of Aristophanes in English translation to learn the form, techniques and conventions of Athenian Old Comedy. We will view modern productions of many of the plays, to see how they can be adapted to the modern theater. We will also study a series of modern film comedies to see their indebtedness to Aristophanes. Among topics to be considered will be fantasy, radical freedom of speech, song, dance, political commentary and invective. This course will not be open to students who have taken FLET 203 Ancient Comedy. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature) or in arts and literature (arts), counts as a Western course toward the cross area requirements, partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature or fulfills the collegiate requirement in fine arts (old curriculum), and counts on the major or minor in Classics and the Film Minor. Four hours. D. McCaffrey

Julio Cortázar’s Hopscotch and Experimental Fiction of 20th century Latin America (HONR 297)

This course will focus on one of the most important novelists of the 20th century, the Argentine author Julio Cortázar, and primarily his masterpiece, Hopscotch as we engage with the text both through very close textual analysis and critical reception of this uniquely different novel. The novel is read like the game “Hopscotch” by “jumping around” out of numerical sequence in a metaphysical search to arrive at the number 10 or “heaven.” By inviting the reader into his game Cortázar sends the reader on the search for the answers to some of life’s biggest questions. In this course we will also read several short stories by Cortázar.  Three Hours.  P. Reagan.

Fall 2014

Six Wives of Henry VIII (HONR 283)

Henry VIII looms large in history—literally and figuratively. Much of the reason for his stature stems from the many women he married, two of whom he discarded quite violently. Who were these supporting players in the life of this charismatic and Janus-faced king? During this course we will explore the lives of Katherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Katherine Howard, and Katherine Parr who shared the same husband but who were remarkable individuals in their own right. While analyzing these women, we will also investigate how they each in their own way breached the traditional boundaries that limited women's lives during the early modern period, In addition to reading scholarly biographies of these women and their irascible and dangerous husband, we will explore fictional treatments of this remarkably disfunctional family in literature and film. Three hours. A. Throckmorton

Through the Looking Glass: Primate Diversity and the Origin of Human Behavior (HONR 298)

This course is a comprehensive study of primate ecological and behavioral diversity. The main goal of the course is to understand the origin of human behavior looking through the looking glass of comparative psychology. Contrary to popular beliefs, the human mind is made by the same parts and pieces of the animal mind. Thus, studying and reflecting on the causes of primate behavioral adaptations will open new avenues for the comprehension of our own behavior. To accomplish this goal, the course is designed to provide students with a detailed description of the extraordinary diversity of primate species both in time, following the evolutionary tree of this unique group, and in space, looking at their different habitats around the world. This course will require students to invest a considerable amount of time in order to reorganize their critical thinking on behavior.  Three hours.  M. Bardi.

 

Archived Honors Courses

2014 - 2015 Courses

Spring 2015

Introduction to the Fairy Tale (HONR 150 01)

Fairy tales have fed man’s imagination for centuries. Yet they are a narrative form that traditionally received relatively little attention from critics. Within the last ten years, however, the fairy tales have come into their own as an object of serious study. It is the purpose of this course to introduce students to the study of fairy tales, their origin, meaning, and evolution. The course will begin with a look at different origin theories. We will then study and apply a variety of theories of interpretation, mythological, historical, psychological, and feminist to a number of well-known tales. The course will close with a look at the way fairy tales continue to appear in contemporary culture, taking on new meaning as they adapt to new cultural norms. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature). Three hours. A. DeGraff.

Homeland Security (HONR 247)

The events of September 11th have left deep scars on the American psyche. It is almost inconceivable that the actions of so few men could change the lives of so many. Fourteen months after 9/11, on November 25th, 2002 President George Bush signed into law the Homeland Security Act of 2002. In the most comprehensive reorganization of the nations' security apparatus since the passage of the National Security Act of 1947, a new Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was created. This ongoing reorganization encompasses at least 22 existing federal agencies and impacts as many as 180,000 employees. In its efforts to consolidate the nations' response capabilities to disasters and emergencies, the Bush administration has created a new superbureaucracy eclipsed only by the existing Department of Defense. This course explores the U.S. response to domestic and foreign terrorism. Topics covered include, the origins and cause of political violence, the role of the federal government in homeland security, the impact on state and local governments, the impact on civil rights and civil liberties and present and future threats to U.S. security. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in social science and counts on the major in Political Science. Three hours. T. Badey.

Religion & the Founding Fathers (HONR 289)

An examination of the religious beliefs and practices of America's Founding Fathers and the impact of religion on the creation and early years of the United States. We will consider the Founders’ views of religion, learn about their understanding of the relationship between religion and other areas of life, and study their personal faiths. We will also focus on the Founders’ conceptions of deity, humanity, morality, and history and examine various ways these influenced their understanding of America, its peoples, and their views of the roles, purposes, and forms of government. In addition, we will reflect on the significance of religion and the Founding Fathers for contemporary America. Area Three in the Religious Studies curriculum: Religion and Culture. Three hours. E. H. Breitenberg.

Ancient Sexuality (HONR 299)

Systems of sexuality and gender in ancient Greece and Rome were very different from our own. The aim of this course is to explore the cultural construction of sexuality and gender in ancient Greece and Rome, approaching them through their depictions in the archaeological and literary record. We will consider questions such as the status of women and the context of misogyny, the multiple manners in which masculinity was constructed, the societal role of same-sex relations, the presentation and visualization of sexuality, desire, and the body. This interdisciplinary approach will allow us to gain an understanding of what Greek and Roman systems of sexuality and gender were, how they changed over time, and how they can be used to offer insights into the shaping of our own cultural and personal attitudes towards sexuality and gender. Counts towards the Social Science AOK, WMST major or minor, and CLAS major or minor. Three hours. B. Natoli.

January 2015

Philosophy of Education (HONR 262)

We will read and discuss classic and contemporary works in the philosophy of education, and recent news articles spotlighting pressing questions in education today. We will consider questions such as the roles of teaching authority and student autonomy, the education of values and desires as compared with skills and information, and the opportunities and dangers of disciplinary specialization. Students will reflect on their own experiences in education, and develop their views as to what sort of education they should pursue for themselves. They will also develop and argue for their views on what kind of education is best to build a healthy, flourishing society. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in civilizations (philosophy and religion) and the cross area requirement in Western culture and multidisciplinary courses, partially fulfills the philosophy and religion requirement under the old curriculum, and counts on the philosophy major and minor. Three hours. B. Huff.

Lysistrata in LaLa Land: Aristophanic Comedy in Greece and Hollywood (HONR 263)

The plays of Aristophanes are the oldest comic dramas in existence today. All other comic dramas are, in some sense, descendants of these plays. This course will study both Aristophanes' plays and American film comedies which most clearly maintain the Aristophanic traditions. We will read all the plays of Aristophanes in English translation to learn the form, techniques and conventions of Athenian Old Comedy. We will view modern productions of many of the plays, to see how they can be adapted to the modern theater. We will also study a series of modern film comedies to see their indebtedness to Aristophanes. Among topics to be considered will be fantasy, radical freedom of speech, song, dance, political commentary and invective. This course will not be open to students who have taken FLET 203 Ancient Comedy. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature) or in arts and literature (arts), counts as a Western course toward the cross area requirements, partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature or fulfills the collegiate requirement in fine arts (old curriculum), and counts on the major or minor in Classics and the Film Minor. Four hours. D. McCaffrey

Julio Cortázar’s Hopscotch and Experimental Fiction of 20th century Latin America (HONR 297)

This course will focus on one of the most important novelists of the 20th century, the Argentine author Julio Cortázar, and primarily his masterpiece, Hopscotch as we engage with the text both through very close textual analysis and critical reception of this uniquely different novel. The novel is read like the game “Hopscotch” by “jumping around” out of numerical sequence in a metaphysical search to arrive at the number 10 or “heaven.” By inviting the reader into his game Cortázar sends the reader on the search for the answers to some of life’s biggest questions. In this course we will also read several short stories by Cortázar.  Three Hours.  P. Reagan.

Fall 2014

Six Wives of Henry VIII (HONR 283)

Henry VIII looms large in history—literally and figuratively. Much of the reason for his stature stems from the many women he married, two of whom he discarded quite violently. Who were these supporting players in the life of this charismatic and Janus-faced king? During this course we will explore the lives of Katherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Katherine Howard, and Katherine Parr who shared the same husband but who were remarkable individuals in their own right. While analyzing these women, we will also investigate how they each in their own way breached the traditional boundaries that limited women's lives during the early modern period, In addition to reading scholarly biographies of these women and their irascible and dangerous husband, we will explore fictional treatments of this remarkably disfunctional family in literature and film. Three hours. A. Throckmorton

Through the Looking Glass: Primate Diversity and the Origin of Human Behavior (HONR 298)

This course is a comprehensive study of primate ecological and behavioral diversity. The main goal of the course is to understand the origin of human behavior looking through the looking glass of comparative psychology. Contrary to popular beliefs, the human mind is made by the same parts and pieces of the animal mind. Thus, studying and reflecting on the causes of primate behavioral adaptations will open new avenues for the comprehension of our own behavior. To accomplish this goal, the course is designed to provide students with a detailed description of the extraordinary diversity of primate species both in time, following the evolutionary tree of this unique group, and in space, looking at their different habitats around the world. This course will require students to invest a considerable amount of time in order to reorganize their critical thinking on behavior.  Three hours.  M. Bardi.

Spring 2013

Mobile Computing Apps (HONR 292 01)
The course will use the App Inventor programming environment to build Android apps (there is not yet an equivalent environment for building iPhone apps). Students will learn how to develop and employ apps for the Android phone using easy to learn tools to design the interface, write the computer code, and either emulate or implement the app on an Android phone. In the classroom discussion and in class lab portions of the course the instructor and students will build a series of example apps with each one getting a little harder and introducing new concepts. Students will improve their problem solving skills through the use of good computing practices related to problem specification, program development, and testing. The coursework will culminate with a final project and presentation. Three hours. Professor Burrell.

Gloriana: The Age of Elizabeth (HONR 294 01)
In 1533, Henry VIII experience bitter disappointment. The child of his second wife, Anne Boleyn, who was supposed to secure the Tudor dynasty turned out not to be an Edward, but an Elizabeth. Henry could not know at the time that his disappointing daughter would grow up to be Gloriana, a queen whose charisma, mercurial disposition, and dissembling craftiness would rival his own. Elizabeth I presided over a golden age that witnessed the flowering of English power and civilization. She also ruled during an age of queens but managed to eclipse them all by exploiting or obscuring her femininity as each situation demanded. In this course, we will explore Elizabeth's unlikely ascension to the throne of England, the strategies she employed to maintain her independence, and how she brilliantly negotiated her way in a man's world. Additionally, we will investigate how filmmakers and fiction writers have appropriated her legacy to promote contemporary ideals. This course counts as HIST101. For this course ONLY, the traditional HIST 100 pre-requisite for HIST 101 does not apply. Three hours. Professor Throckmorton.

J-Term 2013

Don Quijote (HONR 228 01)
This course will focus on Miguel de Cervantes' best-selling novel Don Quijote de la Mancha. This novel is not only Cervantes' best-known work, but is considered one of the great masterpieces of world literature, and the work's eponymous protagonist is one of the most famous of all literary creations. The novel will be studied to appreciate the character of Don Quijote, to understand the plot itself and to examine the creativity of its writer, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. In addition to viewing Cervantes' commentaries on Spanish society of the early seventeenth century and its moral fabric, we will also pay particular attention to the role of reading and writing as portrayed in the novel. We will also look at some central themes of the novel such as the complex relation between fiction and reality, the psychology of Don Quijote as we appreciate the often ribald and scatological humor of the novel. El Quijote is a novel that can be studied for a lifetime, and one to and from which every reader will bring their own experience. Because of this, I will also emphasize the importance for each student to reflect on his or her own reading experiences. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature). Three hours. Professor Malin.

Fall 2012

History of Scientific Thought (HONR 221 01)
This course is a study of the historical development of scientific ideas in the mathematical, physical, and astronomical sciences, from antiquity to the close of the seventeenth century. Since this is an interdisciplinary subject, it requires skills from more than one area, and should be of interest to anyone studying history, philosophy, physics, or mathematics. Students will be expected to analyze and interpret both primary and secondary sources, make considered evaluations of their scientific, philosophical and/or historical significance, and construct cogent arguments in essay form. Partially satisfies the collegiate requirement in history. Three hours. Professor Rice.

Holocaust and Gender (HONR 293 01)
This course examines the different experiences that men and women had as they fell victims to the Holocaust. The course will explore and compare the points of convergence and divergence between male and female experiences in a variety of circumstances, including early persecution, refugee life, concentration camp life, life in hiding, separation and reunion of families, and survival in the postwar era. Through an interdisciplinary lens that combines historical, literary, and visual sources, students will analyze how gendered perspective is reflected in Holocaust diaries, memoirs, and art, as well as in the gendered experiences of perpetrators and their postwar representations. Three hours. Professor Moser.

Spring 2012

Religion & the Founding Fathers (HONR 289)
An examination of the religious beliefs and practices of America's Founding Fathers and the impact of religion on the creation and early years of the United States. We will consider the Founders’ views of religion, learn about their understanding of the relationship between religion and other areas of life, and study their personal faiths. We will also focus on the Founders’ conceptions of deity, humanity, morality, and history and examine various ways these influenced their understanding of America, its peoples, and their views of the roles, purposes, and forms of government. In addition, we will reflect on the significance of religion and the Founding Fathers for contemporary America. Area Three in the Religious Studies curriculum: Religion and Culture. Three hours. E. H. Breitenberg

Cormac Country (HONR 290)
Critic Harold Bloom joins many others in counting Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian among the best novels of the twentieth century, comparing it favorable to Moby Dick and deeming it "the ultimate western". In this course, we will consider McCarthy's rise to prominence as a canonical American writer as well as a shaper of American culture. Given the centrality of the western to American self-definition, what does Cormac McCarthy have to tell us about ourselves, our country and American civilization? What is the meaning of a moral life within that landscape? How does the dramatic interpretation of McCarthy’s work, and its translation to new media, change the landscape and reflect national values? We will seek answers to these questions by charting the landscape of McCarthy's imagination through place, history, and literature. We will reveal it in the historical and literary texts that complement his work, even as we read widely in McCarthy's work in varied genres. A primary concern of this course will be the place of indigenous people in McCarthy's geography. Class requirements include an online reading journal, presentations, papers, a midterm, and a trip to a film debut (if timing permits). Three hours. B. Giemza

Dimension and Direction (HONR 291)
The human race has always sought to better understand its physical place of being: whereas an early cartographer would have asked, "What is the shape of Earth," a modern physicist might similarly ponder, "What is the shape of the universe?" Two broad notions naturally arise out of any such explorations of "place": dimension and direction. In this course, we'll investigate these ideas from an intuitive perspective. Topics include manifolds, orientability, classification of surfaces, embeddings and knotting, space-filling curves, and fractals. Three hours. D. Clark

January 2012

Zen & Creativity/Permission Required (HONR 215)
This course investigates the connections between the Buddhist concept of Zen and the notion of creativity commonly used by visual and conceptual artists. Students study meditation techniques and other physical/mental strategies to accomplish artistic and expressive work. Includes trip to Zen Mountain Monastery in upstate New York. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (arts). Must also enroll in PHED101.14 (Zazen Meditation). Three hours. R. Berry

The New Atheism (HONR 275)
Recent books by Christopher Hitchens, Richard Dawkins and others have helped spur a cultural and political movement that is being called "the new atheism." In this course, we will critically evaluate the new atheists' arguments against God and religion, as well as explore secularists' attempts to organize politically in an America that is quite hostile to their interests. Three hours. R. Meagher

Fall 2011

The Nature of Evil (HONR 253)
A study of the nature of evil as portrayed in fiction and film about three iconic figures: Dracula, a representative of supernatural or Satanic evil; the Frankenstein monster, the result of perverted rationalism and science; and Jack the Ripper, a product of innately human or psychopathological evil—all embodiments of our own insecurities and fears of the strange and unfamiliar. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature). Four hours. T. Inge

Defining the Classical Style (HONR 274)
Classical art, classical music, Neoclassical architecture, Classic Rock. What is this "Classical Style" we hold in such high esteem? Why is it that the art and culture of the Classical civilizations of Greece and Rome are still influencing our world today? In his book Neuroarthistory (Yale, 2007), John Onians comments, paraphrasing the works of Karl Marx: "The appeal of Greek art lies in it being a product of the childhood of humanity." Famous men from Aristotle to Leonardo, John Locke to Sigmund Freud considered the classical style of the Greeks to be the standard against which their own times were measured. So what precisely is "Classical"? In this course we will examine the definition of 'classical' by studying in depth the classical style in the art and architecture of the Greeks and Romans, and by tracing the evolution of the idea of the 'classical style' through the Renaissance, Neoclassical period, and modern era, in art, architecture, design, music and cinema. Illustrated lectures will be accompanied by visits to museums, buildings and monuments, and concerts, if available. Three hours. E. Fisher

Six Wives of Henry VIII (HONR 283)
Henry VIII looms large in history—literally and figuratively. Much of the reason for his stature stems from the many women he married, two of whom he discarded quite violently. Who were these supporting players in the life of this charismatic and Janus-faced king? During this course we will explore the lives of Katherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Katherine Howard, and Katherine Parr who shared the same husband but who were remarkable individuals in their own right. While analyzing these women, we will also investigate how they each in their own way breached the traditional boundaries that limited women's lives during the early modern period, In addition to reading scholarly biographies of these women and their irascible and dangerous husband, we will explore fictional treatments of this remarkably disfunctional family in literature and film. Three hours. A. Throckmorton

Cultural Encounters in Lit & Film (HONR 288)
This course focuses primarily on a number of modern novels and films that explore what can happen when different cultures come into contact with one another. These works represent the idea of borders or boundaries, whether physical or metaphoric, between cultural communities (what happens when boundaries dissolve or become porous? When individuals choose to cross them?); they also portray the related concept of "contact zones" between cultures — that is, the idea that cultural contacts always occur in specific or concrete kinds of places or situations. The texts on our syllabus often concern social, ethnic, or racial groups that are unequal with regard to "inclusion/exclusion" wealth, political power, and social prestige. They also focus on what happens when the relationships between the groups begin to change, or when a given order is being questioned. These texts tend to show how social circumstances and social change can affect the lives of individuals at a deeply personal level—in a person's sense of self, family, life and so on. Three hours. A. Hilliard

Spring 2011

Mathematical Origami (HONR 248)
There are many connections between the beautiful art of origami and the elegant formality of mathematics. This course will use paper folding as a tool for exploring several areas of mathematics. Topics will include modular origami and graph theory, the relationship between flat folds, conic sections, and algebra, straight edge and compass constructions versus folded constructions, number theory, and linear algebra. Students will develop their skills in creating origami and in making and proving mathematical conjectures. There will be a small fee for supplies. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (mathematics). Three hours. E. Torrence

The Six Wives of King Henry VIII (HONR 283)
Henry VIII looms large in history - literally and figuratively. Much of the reason for his stature stems from the many women he married, two of whom he discarded quite violently. Who were these supporting players in the life of this charismatic and Janus-faced king? During this course we will explore the lives of Katherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Katherine Howard, and Katherine Parr who shared the same husband but who were remarkable individuals in their own right. While analyzing these women, we will also investigate how they each in their own way breached the traditional boundaries that limited women's lives during the early modern period, In addition to reading scholarly biographies of these women and their irascible and dangerous husband, we will explore fictional treatments of this remarkably disfunctional family in literature and film. Three hours. A. Throckmorton

Sport in Contemporary Society (HONR 284)
The objective of this course is to provide a critical understanding of sport in today's global society. Issues to be covered include youth sports and socialization, and the problems of racism, sexism, performance enhancing drugs, gambling, commercializetion, and violence in sport. Other topics include the relationship between sport and other social institutions such as the mass media, the educational system, and religion, will be addressed in a historical and comparative framework in lectures, readings, films, and student research. Additionally, we shall examine the Olympics and World Cup soccer as two prime examples of the phenomena of sport in the 21st Century. Three hours. R. Dunkel

Detective Fiction and the Legacy of East European Jewry (HONR 286)
This course turns to genres of fiction for which finding clues and following traces are defining features—broadly conceived as the mystery tale and detective story—in order to investigate how authors in Germany, Austria, the United States, and Israel sought to track down (and sometimes create) the legacy of East European Jewry through fiction. The course examines a variety of primary texts from the early twentieth century to the present by authors including Gustav Meyrink, Isaac Bashevis Singer, S.Y. Agnon, Michael Chabon, and Richard Price, as well as secondary texts. The course will also consider the extent to which these texts ask the reader to play the role of detective and to thus participate in the process of search and recovery that the texts enact. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature). Three hours. R. Benson

Human Origins (HONR 287)
The central question for this course is “what does it mean to be human?” We will explore the origin of our own species by examining evidence for human evolution from diverse disciplines including anthropology, paleontology, classical genetics, population genetics, and molecular genetics. We will seek an answer to the question of whether we are the “crown of creation” or just one of a multitude of briefly successful species whose ultimate fate is extinction. Similarities and differences between Homo sapiens and other primates, both extinct and extant, will be investigated. We will look at the alternative explanations for human origins presented by creationism and intelligent design. Laboratories will parallel the evolutionary topics discussed in class. Includes field trip to visit the new Hall of Human Origins, scheduled to open in 2010, at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington, D. C. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in science and mathematics (natural science with laboratory). Four hours. E. Falls

January 2011

Zen & Creativity (HONR 215 01)
This course investigates the connections between the Buddhist concept of Zen and the notion of creativity commonly used by visual and conceptual artists. Students study meditation techniques and other physical/mental strategies to accomplish artistic and expressive work. Includes trip to Zen Mountain Monastery in upstate New York. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (arts). Must also enroll in PHED101.14 (Zazen Meditation). Three hours. R. Berry

Don Quijote (HONR 228 01)
This course will focus on Miguel de Cervantes’ best-selling novel Don Quijote de la Mancha. This novel is not only Cervantes’ best-known work, but is considered one of the great masterpieces of world literature, and the work's eponymous protagonist is one of the most famous of all literary creations. The novel will be studied to appreciate the character of Don Quijote, to understand the plot itself and to examine the creativity of its writer, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. In addition to viewing Cervantes’ commentaries on Spanish society of the early seventeenth century and its moral fabric, we will also pay particular attention to the role of reading and writing as portrayed in the novel. We will also look at some central themes of the novel such as the complex relation between fiction and reality and the psychology of Don Quijote as we appreciate the often ribald and scatological humor of the novel. El Quijote is a novel that can be studied for a lifetime, and one to and from which every reader will bring their own experience. Because of this, I will also emphasize the importance for each student to reflect on his or her own reading experiences. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature). Three hours. M. Malin

Genre Fiction (HONR 282 01)
Genre Fiction is an introduction to popular contemporary genre literature - the types of books frequently found in grocery stores, airports, and best sellers lists, and only very rarely found in the college classroom. Romances, science fiction novels, detective stories, fantasy epics, and horror stories may be snubbed as escapist, “low-brow” literature, but the pleasures these texts yield reveal much about contemporary culture. By scrutinizing genre fiction with the same academic rigor we apply to “great” literature, we will try to define a variety of popular genres and come to an understanding of what makes these genres—and the specific texts we will read— so appealing. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature). Three hours. J. Cadwallader

Fall 2010

Introduction to the Fairy Tale (HONR 150 01)
Fairy tales have fed man’s imagination for centuries. Yet they are a narrative form that traditionally received relatively little attention from critics. Within the last ten years, however, the fairy tales have come into their own as an object of serious study. It is the purpose of this course to introduce students to the study of fairy tales, their origin, meaning, and evolution. The course will begin with a look at different origin theories. We will then study and apply a variety of theories of interpretation, mythological, historical, psychological, and feminist to a number of well-known tales. The course will close with a look at the way fairy tales continue to appear in contemporary culture, taking on new meaning as they adapt to new cultural norms. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature). Three hours. A. DeGraff

“The Yellow Peril” in American History—New freshmen only (HONR 278 01)
This course will examine the “Yellow Peril”, a conceptual product of anti-Asian racism that began with the advent of mass Chinese immigration to the West Coast in the late nineteenth century, and continued with stereotypes of Japanese and Japanese-Americans in WWII propaganda. Through primary sources such as newspapers, magazines, comic books and film, we will examine the roots of anti-Asian racism in this country as well as the culture(s) that allowed it to flourish. Applicable towards the AOK requirement when combined with HIST101 or equivalent. Three hours. T. Munson

Dirt, Immunity & Cancer (HONR 279 01)
Is dirt actually good for us? Could the increased prevalence of allergy and asthma in developed nations be a side effect of too much cleanliness? This course will examine the elegant mechanisms through which the immune system defends against pathogens and the consequences of failed or inappropriate immune responses (i.e. immunodeficiency, allergy, autoimmunity). Students will then apply this knowledge to understand how the environment (i.e. dirt, or lack thereof) impacts the immune system. This course will also explore how the immune response is exploited to develop immunological therapies for cancer and other diseases. Current ethical and social issues associated with immunological problems will be highlighted including vaccination, bio-terrorism, and AIDS. Lectures will frequently be supplemented with historical and recent immunologically-relevant scientific discoveries as well as medical case studies. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in science and mathematics (natural science with laboratory). Four hours. M. Gubbels-Bupp

Science & Pseudoscience (HONR 280 01)
Natural science is the foundation of modern technology and medicine, yet a number of pseudoscientific notions still persist in our society. From the astrology columns in most newspapers to insurance policies covering acupuncture procedures to the battle to teach “intelligent design” in schools, pseudoscientific ideas are promoted either under the guise of legitimate science, or as an equally relevant alternative to natural and social science. In this class, we will examine how science works, and develop a toolkit of critical thinking to understand why pseudoscientific thinking is simultaneously attractive and harmful. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in science and mathematics (natural science, no laboratory). Three hours. M. Francis

Poverty & Welfare in the United States (HONR 281 01)
This course examines the changing prevalence and consequences of poverty in the United States, successes and failures of the welfare system and the experiences of those living in poverty. In addition, we will consider how dominant national values—about individualism and dependence, about gender and race—shape the policies we enact to address poverty. In addition to exploring these issues through social science literature, each section of the course will include lab sessions where students will use SPSS (a statistical software package) to conduct original analyses of existing data about poverty and welfare. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the social sciences (sociology). Four hours. A. Armenia

2009 - 2010 Courses

Spring 2010

HONR 123 — The Ascent of Man - A seminar on turning points in the cultural evolution of humanity. According to Jacob Bronowski, “Man ascends by discovering the fullness of his own gifts . . . What he creates on the way are monuments to the stages in his understanding of nature and self.” Substitutes for History 101 or HIST 112 and counts as a multidisciplinary and a Western course toward the Cross Area Requirements. Three hours. Mr. Porter.

HONR 234 — Woody Allen and the Art of Comedy - Woody Allen proved to be one of the twentieth-century’s most versatile creative forces as a fiction writer, stand-up comedian, scriptwriter, playwright, film director, and actor. In all of his comic work, he has been a serious artist with a consistent vision about modern life and society and the human condition. This course will explore that vision through a study and analysis of his writings and work as a major American humorist. Four hours. Mr. Inge.

HONR 274 – Defining the Classical Style – Classical art, classical music, Neoclassical architecture, Classic Rock. What is this “Classical Style” we hold in such high esteem? Why is it that the art and culture of the Classical civilizations of Greece and Rome are still influencing our world today? In his book Neuroarthistory (Yale, 2007), John Onians comments, paraphrasing the words of Karl Marx: “The appeal of Greek art lies in it being a product of the childhood of humanity.” Famous men from Aristotle to Leonardo, John Locke to Sigmund Freud considered the classical style of the Greeks to be the standard against which their own times were measured. So what precisely is “Classical?” In this course we will examine the definition of ‘classical’ by studying in depth the classical style in the art and architecture of the Greeks and Romans, and by tracing the evolution of the idea of the ‘classical style’ through the Renaissance, Neoclassical period, and modern era, in art, architecture, design, music and cinema. Illustrated lectures will be accompanied by visits to museums, buildings and monuments, and concerts, if available. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (arts) and counts as a multidisciplinary and Western course toward the Cross Area Requirement. Counts on the Classics major or minor, the Art History major or minor, and as an art history course on the Studio Arts major. Three hours. Ms. Fisher.

HONR 277 – Music & the Moving Image – This course examines the art of film music and the role music plays in the formation of narrative meaning in film. Students will develop an understanding of the musical techniques utilized by composers and the ways those techniques shape the viewing experience. Particular attention will be paid to recognizing the ways composers’ employ mood, orchestration, thematic unity, and stylistic diversity to complement and contradict the action on the screen. The course is divided into four large units: the Silent Era, Early Sound Film, Classic Hollywood, and the Post-Studio Era. In each unit, students will examine the aesthetics of the period and analyze representative film scores. In addition to learning strategies for analysis and interpretation, students will also have the opportunity to compose their own original film scores. No musical experience is required. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (arts) and counts as a Western course toward the Cross Area Requirement. 4 hours. Mr. Doering.

JANUARY 2010

HONR 243 — Homer and Hollywood: The Iliad and the Odyssey in Film -The Iliad and the Odyssey of Homer are classics of Greek and Western Literature and have had an enormous impact on high culture in the lofty reaches of great art, music, literature and performance. They deserve such a position and every educated person should learn how to read, comprehend and profit from them. They were also extremely popular and accessible throughout antiquity, and were enjoyed in their own right as smashing good yarns, riveting stories and entrancing performance pieces. This course will not only read and examine all of both works and place them in their appropriate context as literature of the heroic, oral and tragic traditions, but will also explore their themes and images as pop culture entertainment – both then and now by examining several films which attempted to either tell the same story or used the themes and plots of the epics in different contexts. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (arts) and counts on the major or minor in Classics. Four hours. Mr. Daugherty.

HONR 253 – The Nature of Evil: Monsters and Others - A study of the nature of evil as portrayed in fiction and film about three iconic figures: Dracula, a representative of supernatural or Satanic evil; the Frankenstein monster, the result of perverted rationalism and science; and Jack the Ripper, a product of innately human or psychopathological evil—all embodiments of our own insecurities and fears of the strange and unfamiliar. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature). Four hours. Mr. Inge.

HONR 255 – Monsters and Modernism - Monsters and Modernism, or “Who are you calling weird?” focuses on the human fascination with otherness that can be traced back to ancient Greece and the Cyclops in Homer’s Iliad and other mythical half-human monsters, and even earlier to the allegorical tales of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. Modern otherness is highlighted in the debates surrounding identity politics—the civil rights, feminist, and in particular, the disability rights movements. This course considers the various theories and methods that social scientists employ to examine identity (including lengthy conversations about postmodernism and alternative epistemologies) in an attempt to better understand how normalcy is socially determined. The examination will include a closer look at popular culture, and specifically how disability and other differences amongst individuals are portrayed in film, television, print media, etc. Students will be expected to read and disseminate a wide variety of sources, write several substantive papers responding to major class themes, and engage in regular Socratic dialog during class meetings and the small groups that will meet. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the social sciences (sociology), counts as a multidisciplinary course toward the Cross Area Requirements, and counts on the sociology major or minor in group 4. Three hours. Mr. Trammell.

HONR 272 – Natural History of Southern Africa – This field course will be a study of the natural history of South Africa, including a comparison of diverse biological communities, wildlife, plant life, and physiography. Probable sites visited during the 16 day field experience in South Africa include Kruger National Park, Game Preserve, Drakensberg Mountains, Karoo Desert, Table Mountain, Blade River Canyon, Tsitsikamma National Park, and Capetown. Biological/ecological principles will be incorporated along with conservation issues relevant to the diverse areas to be visited. In addition to comparative observational study of the varied sites, a 2-3 day field research project will be conducted by student groups at one site. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (natural science with laboratory). May be counted as an elective on the Biology major. Four hours. Mr. Knisley.

HONR 276 – International Marketing – Issues and Applications – This travel course will draw on principles of marketing (Product, Pricing, Distribution and Promotion) in an international context with an emphasis on Business to Consumer (B2C) marketing. Students will complete a project and a marketing plan comparing and contrasting marketing practices in both the United States and in Great Britain. Offered at Wroxton College, the history of the origins and structure of the EU and the British Parliament will be taught by Wroxton staff. Students will attend debates and participate in discussions with British economists and politicians at the U.K. Parliament. Selected industry tours included. Certain lectures and travel opportunities may be held jointly with students in ECON 383. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the Social Sciences (Economics and Business) and the Experiential (travel) Cross Area Requirement. May be substituted for BUSN 380 on the Economics and Business major. Three hours. Mr. Showalter

Fall 2009

HONR 267 – Politics and film – An examination of popular feature films focused on the institutions and processes of American government. Students are asked to examine the accuracy of the film’s exposition as well as the interpretation of government offered. Students are also asked to examine how the resources available to the film maker have been used to direct the films’ audiences to that interpretation. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (arts) or social science (political science), and counts as a multidisciplinary course toward the Cross Area Requirement. Counts as an elective for the political science major or minor and substitutes for FILM 210 on the Film minor. Four hours. Ms. Conners.

HONR 271 – King Arthur in Literature and Popular Culture – This course will focus on the representation of one of the most famed literary and historical figures of all time—Arthur of Britain. Arthur’s life—including myths about his mysterious upbringing, his rise to power (perhaps with the help of witches), and his love (including the disastrous marriage to Guinevere) was chronicled extensively in literature from the middle ages on in texts like Spenser’s The Faerie Queene and Tennyson’s The Epic. Though much of our work in the course will focus on reading and analyzing texts that feature either Arthur or his knights (and often both), we will also consider how and why Arthur has become such a major part of our culture today—enough to inspire films, musicals, and even television shows. All the while, we’ll learn about why Arthur, his knights, and his bride, Guinevere, became such important expressions of England and of Britain more generally. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature) and counts on the English major or minor. Three hours. Ms. Cull.

HONR 273 – Big Screen Greece: Greek Civilization in Film – This course will examine the depiction of the history and culture of classical Greece from the end of the dark ages (c. 750 BC) to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC) in American films. We will concentrate on several topics and events such as myth, the Sword and Sandal or Peplon genre, Greek drama, Socrates, the Battle of Thermopylae, Xenophon’s Anabasis and the career of Alexander. In the process we will examine the nature of historical truth versus artistic truth. Substitutes for History 100 and counts on the Classics, Latin, and Greek majors or the Classics minor. Four hours. Mr. Daugherty.

HONR 275 – The New Atheism – Recent books by Christopher Hitchens, Richard Dawkins and others have helped spur a cultural and political movement that is being called "the new atheism." In this course, we will critically evaluate the new atheists' arguments against God and religion, as well as explore secularists' attempts to organize politically in an America that is quite hostile to their interests. Counts as a multidisciplinary course toward the Cross Area Requirement. Counts in group 1 on the Political Science major. Three hours. Mr. Meagher.

2008 - 2009 Courses

Fall 2008

225 — Discovering Women in the Biological Sciences This course will examine the contributions of women to the scientific discovery of major principles in various biological fields. Basic biological principles in the various fields will be introduced, and biographies/autobiographies and scientific publications of women working as scientists in those fields will be studied. The course will also explore the history and politics of women's involvement in biology and examine how science has viewed women. The status of contemporary women scientists and the difficulties they have encountered will be investigated. Laboratories will parallel biological topics covered in class. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (natural science with laboratory) and counts on the major/minor in women's studies and substitutes for BIOL 122 on the major/minor biology. Four hours. Ms. Falls.

253 — The Nature of Evil: Monsters and Others A study of the nature of evil as portrayed in fiction and film about three iconic figures: Dracula, a representative of supernatural or Satanic evil; the Frankenstein monster, the result of perverted rationalism and science; and Jack the Ripper, a product of innately human or psychopathological evil: all embodiments of our own insecurities and fears of the strange and unfamiliar. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature). Four hours. Mr. Inge.

267 — Politics and film — An examination of popular feature films focused on the institutions and processes of American government. Students are asked to examine the accuracy of the film's exposition as well as the interpretation of government offered. Students are also asked to examine how the resources available to the film maker have been used to direct the films' audiences to that interpretation. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (arts) or social science (political science), and counts as a multidisciplinary course toward the Cross Area Requirement. Counts as an elective for the political science major or minor and substitutes for FILM 210 on the Film minor. Four hours. Mr. Sheckels.

January 2009

215 — Zen and the Creative Act This course investigates the connections between the Buddhist concept of Zen and the notion of creativity commonly used by visual and conceptual artists. Students study meditation techniques and other physical/mental strategies to accomplish artistic and expressive work. Includes trip to Zen Mountain Monastery in upstate New York. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (arts) counts as a multidisciplinary and non-Western course toward the Cross Area Requirement. Three hours. Mr. Berry.

228 — Cervantes' Don Quijote This course will focus on Miguel de Cervantes' bestselling novel Don Quijote de la Mancha. This novel is not only Cervantes' bestknown work, but is considered one of the great masterpieces of world literature, and the work's eponymous protagonist is one of the most famous of all literary creations. The novel will be studied to appreciate the character of Don Quijote, to understand the plot itself and to examine the creativity of its writer, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. In addition to viewing Cervantes' commentaries on Spanish society of the early seventeenth century and its moral fabric, we will also pay particular attention to the role of reading and writing as portrayed in the novel. We will also look at some central themes of the novel such as the complex relation between fiction and reality, the psychology of Don Quijote as we appreciate the often ribald and scatological humor of the novel. El Quijote is a novel that can be studied for a lifetime, and one to and from which every reader will bring their own experience. Because of this, the course also emphasizes the importance of each student reflecting on his or her own reading experiences. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature). Three hours. Mr. Malin.

252 — It's About Time - What, then, is time? I know well enough what it is, provided that no one asks me; but if I am asked and try to explain, I am baffled.†St. Augustine. Is time merely what clocks measure, or does it have meaning and substance of its own? Is my “now†the same as yours? Is yesterday real? Can we predict tomorrow? The mystery of time engages every area of human inquiry. In this exploration, we will concentrate on scientific understandings of time, but will also examine the philosophical, theological perspectives. Through readings, experiments, and discussion students will construct their own understanding of time and its meaning. Scientifically, we will pursue various ways of thinking about and measuring time, and the notions of spacetime emerging from contemporary physics. We will also consider various ways of conceiving time in the history of religions, and the different perceptions of time expressed in the Bible. The course will culminate in a consideration of the nature of the future: does the flow of time carry us into a future that is already determined, or do our actions in the present shape an open future? Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (natural science with laboratory), and counts as a multidisciplinary course toward the Cross Area Requirement. Four Hours. Mr. Spagna.

268 — Truth and meaning — What determines meaning? Is it what you intend? What about truth? Doesn't the truth matter to what words mean? Do you know what I mean? How do you know? This course examines a variety of philosophical traditions which address truth and meaning in the context of language. We focus on the relationship of language to the world, meaning to intention and how communication works. through speech acts as well as nonverbal acts and other contextual factors. We examine views from the tradition of analytic philosophy as well as a variety of responses to this from other traditions. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in civilizations (philosophy or religion) and counts as an elective on the major or minor in philosophy. Three hours. Ms. Turney.

Spring 2009

255 — Monsters and Modernism Monsters and Modernism, or Who are you calling weird? Focuses on the human fascination with otherness that can be traced back to ancient Greece and the Cyclops in Homer's Iliad and other mythical halfhuman monsters, and even earlier to the allegorical tales of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. Modern otherness is highlighted in the debates surrounding identity politics: the civil rights, feminist, and in particular, the disability rights movements. This course considers the various theories and methods that social scientists employ to examine identity (including lengthy conversations about postmodernism and alternative epistemologies) in an attempt to better understand how normalcy is socially determined. The examination will include a closer look at popular culture, and specifically how disability and other differences amongst individuals are portrayed in film, television, print media, etc. Students will be expected to read and disseminate a wide variety of sources, write several substantive papers responding to major class themes, and engage in regular Socratic dialog during class meetings and the small groups that will meet. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the social sciences (sociology), counts as a multidisciplinary course toward the Cross Area Requirements, and counts on the sociology major or minor in group 4. Three hours. Mr. Trammell.

265 — Salvador Dali and Luis Buuel: Artistic and cinematic visions of Spanish Avantgarde — In this course we will analyze the most outstanding works and films by the international Catalan painter and writer Salvador Dal and filmaker Luis Buuel. In order to carry out such task, we will use certain theoretical readings on Avantgarde artistic trends of the 1920s and 1930s. To this end, we will read the aesthetic essay La deshumanización del arte (The dehumanization of the Arts) by essayist and thinker Ortega y Gasset, and the classic theoretical text by Matei Calinescu, Five Faces of Modernity. We will also explore the psychoanalytical implications and interpretations of those works that were the result of the collaboration between Dal and Buuel in their early stages of their careers, and those that once both artists split, still establish an aesthetic as well as personal dialog between them. Another significant point to look at is the fascination and influence of Garca Lorca over the two artists. Along with the former readings, we will consider texts related to Surrealism and Freudian psychology, very popular among Avantgarde artists. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (arts or literature) and counts as a Western and multidisciplinary course toward the Cross Area Requirements. Four hours. Ms. Bordera-Amerigo.

269 — Infinity — A consideration of infinity from historical and modern perspectives. Throughout history, infinity has been encountered in never ending processes, limitless distances, and unbounded quantities. These encounters have often led to skepticism or downright rejection of infinity. This course will address the paradoxes and difficulties associated with infinity and their modern resolutions. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in Natural and Mathematical Sciences (mathematics) and counts as an elective on the Classics major or minor. Three hours. Mr. Sutton.

270 — Portrait of France: Is it all about Berets, Baguettes and Burning cars? A cultural and historical journey within France through literature and film — In the past 50 years France has suffered major transformations. It has experienced occupation and hideous wars on its territory. It has occupied other lands and fought to maintain its authority in its colonies, mainly in Africa and Asia. In very recent years, French youth has been seen reacting to the ongoing political and social movements, captured by the international press rioting and burning cars. The cultural uniqueness that defined the country for centuries has encountered new literary, linguistic and cultural influences. Yet, some might assert that France has successfully maintained a cultural distinctiveness that set it apart from its European neighbors. So what does it mean to be French? Do all Frenchmen just wear berets, carry baguettes and burn cars? Through an exploration of literary texts and movies, this course analyzes the portrayals of France given by authors and film directors along with their commentaries on French society. While it offers a journey within France and its various regions, it will highlight the diversity that exists within what is considered French culture. It will help students understand French history and analyze the various images of France available. It will also encourage them to reconsider habitual stereotypes and to examine how the languages and cultures of France have evolved, especially when in interaction with others. Among other topics, this course will present the rise of modern Paris from the French Revolution to today, and examine the physical and sociological changes of the city and the country in terms of identity, geography and social and political values. Some of the themes discussed will be industrialization, socialism, urban violence, colonization, national identity, Europe and patriotism. This course will be taught in English. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature) and counts as a Western and multidisciplinary course toward the CAR requirements. Four hours. Ms. Teixidor.

2007 - 2008 Courses

Fall 2007

217 — Death and Dying This course develops the social and cultural sources of our hopes, values and fears toward matters of dying and death. Beginning with historical and crosscultural analysis of death orientations, the course proceeds to sociologically develop the role of religion, philosophy, psychology, science, politics, and medicine in shaping our orientations toward war, abortion, suicide, environmental destruction, organ transplants, euthanasia, funeral ritual, and capital punishment. It concludes with analyses of the experiences of those who die and those who survive, including KublerRoss's studies of the stages of death, the outofbody sensations reported by those surviving clinical death, and the normal experiences associated with grief and bereavement. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in social science (sociology), counts as a Western course toward the CAR requirements, partially satisfies the collegiate requirement in the social sciences under the old curriculum, and counts in group three in the major/minor in sociology. Three hours. Ms. Gill.

247 — Homeland Security The events of September 11th have left deep scars on the American psyche. It is almost inconceivable that the actions of so few men could change the lives of so many. Fourteen months after 9/11, on November 25th, 2002 President George Bush signed into law the Homeland Security Act of 2002. In the most comprehensive reorganization of the nations' security apparatus since the passage of the National Security Act of 1947, a new Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was created. This ongoing reorganization encompasses at least 22 existing federal agencies and impacts as many as 180,000 employees. In its efforts to consolidate the nations' response capabilities to disasters and emergencies, the Bush administration has created a new superbureaucracy eclipsed only by the existing Department of Defense. This course explores the U.S. response to domestic and foreign terrorism. Topics covered include, the origins and cause of political violence, the role of the federal government in homeland security, the impact on state and local governments, the impact on civil rights and civil liberties and present and future threats to U.S. security. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in social science (political science), partially fulfills the social science requirement under the old curriculum, and counts on the major and minor in Political Science. Three hours. Mr. Badey.

255 — Monsters and Modernism Monsters and Modernism, or “Who are you calling weird?†focuses on the human fascination with otherness that can be traced back to ancient Greece and the Cyclops in Homer's Iliad and other mythical halfhuman monsters, and even earlier to the allegorical tales of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. Modern otherness is highlighted in the debates surrounding identity politics: the civil rights, feminist, and in particular, the disability rights movements. This course considers the various theories and methods that social scientists employ to examine identity (including lengthy conversations about postmodernism and alternative epistemologies) in an attempt to better understand how normalcy is socially determined. The examination will include a closer look at popular culture, and specifically how disability and other differences amongst individuals are portrayed in film, television, print media, etc. Students will be expected to read and disseminate a wide variety of sources, write several substantive papers responding to major class themes, and engage in regular Socratic dialog during class meetings and the small groups that will meet. Partially fulfills the social science requirement under the old curriculum, partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the social sciences, counts as a multidisciplinary course toward the CAR requirements, partially fulfills the social science requirement under the old curriculum, and counts on the sociology major or minor in group 4. Three hours. Mr. Trammell.

261 — Extremophiles: Strange New Worlds in Biology — Scientists have recently discovered many new and amazing microorganisms inhabiting extreme environments†around the world. Studies which have compared the DNA of these organisms have revealed that some may lie close to the “universal ancestor†of all extant life on earth. Thus, knowledge of extremophiles may hold the key to understanding how life on earth evolved and may direct our search for life on other planets. The unusual metabolic abilities of extremophiles are providing science and industry with an increasing number of novel enzymes that have already found use in such diverse industrial and biotechnological applications as laundry detergents, DNA fingerprinting (PCR), and food production. This course will cover many of the fundamental principles of modern biology which will then serve as a basis for studying the variety of microorganisms that have been found in “extreme environments†of heat or cold, pH, salinity, pressure, and radiation. Fundamental biological principles will emphasize chemical and cellular bases of life, cell metabolism and energy transformation, molecular genetics, the origin and evolution of life, and a survey of the prokaryotes, protistans, and fungi with particular reference to prokaryote diversity. Extremophilic groups will include (but will not be limited to) thermophilic bacteria from deepsea vents that prefer boiling temperatures and a diet of sulfur and hydrogen, acidophilic organisms from miledeep caves can that can live at a pH of 0 (10 times the acidity of stomach acid), and ironoxidizing bacteria that live without oxygen in solid rock beneath the ocean floor. Astrobiology and the evidence and possibility of extremophilic life on Mars will also be discussed. Laboratory work will involve the collection of unknown (possibly new) acidophilic microorganisms from a local mine and their subsequent study and identification through morphological observation, experimentation, and molecular sequencing. This course will partially satisfy the natural and mathematical sciences Area of Knowledge requirement (science with laboratory) , partially fulfills the laboratory science requirement under the old curriculum, and will substitute for BIOL 122 on the biology major and minor. Four hours. Mr. Martin.

January 2008

150 — Will They Live Happily Ever After?: An Introduction to the Fairy Tale Fairy tales have fed man's imagination for centuries. Yet they are a narrative form that traditionally received relatively little attention from critics. Within the last ten years, however, the fairy tales have come into their own as an object of serious study. It is the purpose of this course to introduce students to the study of fairy tales, their origin, meaning, and evolution. The course will begin with a look at different origin theories. We will then study and apply a variety of theories of interpretation, mythological, historical, psychological, and feminist to a number of wellknown tales. The course will close with a look at the way fairy tales continue to appear in contemporary culture, taking on new meaning as they adapt to new cultural norms. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature) or partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature (old curriculum). Three hours. Ms. deGraff.

262 — Philosophy of Education We will read and discuss classic and contemporary works in the philosophy of education, and recent news articles spotlighting pressing questions in education today. We will consider questions such as the roles of teaching authority and student autonomy, the education of values and desires as compared with skills and information, and the opportunities and dangers of disciplinary specialization. Students will reflect on their own experiences in education, and develop their views as to what sort of education they should pursue for themselves. They will also develop and argue for their views on what kind of education is best to build a healthy, flourishing society. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in civilizations (philosophy and religion) and the cross area requirement in Western culture and multidisciplinary courses, partially fulfills the philosophy and religion requirement under the old curriculum, and counts on the philosophy major and minor. Three hours. Mr. Huff.

263 — Lysistrata in LaLa Land: Aristophanic Comedy in Greece and Hollywood — The plays of Aristophanes are the oldest comic dramas in existence today. All other comic dramas are, in some sense, descendants of these plays. This course will study both Aristophanes' plays and American film comedies which most clearly maintain the Aristophanic traditions. We will read all the plays of Aristophanes in English translation to learn the form, techniques and conventions of Athenian Old Comedy. We will view modern productions of many of the plays, to see how they can be adapted to the modern theater. We will also study a series of modern film comedies to see their indebtedness to Aristophanes. Among topics to be considered will be fantasy, radical freedom of speech, song, dance, political commentary and invective. This course will not be open to students who have taken FLET 203 Ancient Comedy. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature) or in arts and literature (arts), counts as a Western course toward the cross area requirements, partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature or fulfills the collegiate requirement in fine arts (old curriculum), and counts on the major or minor in Classics and the Film Minor. Four hours. Mr. McCaffrey

Spring 2008

123 — The Ascent of Man A seminar on turning points in the cultural evolution of humanity. According to Jacob Bronowski, “Man ascends by discovering the fullness of his own gifts . . . What he creates on the way are monuments to the stages in his understanding of nature and self. Substitutes for History 101 (new curriculum) or HIST 112 (old curriculum). Three hours. Mr. Porter.

226 — Life Is? This course will introduce students to fundamental concepts in biology by focusing on topics of current interest such as genetic engineering, stem cells, cloning, evolution, and the process of scientific discovery. Principles to be emphasized will include essential chemistry, the cellular basis of life, metabolism, Mendelian inheritance, Darwinian evolution, and a survey of the diversity of life on earth. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (natural science with laboratory), partially fulfills the laboratory science requirement under the old curriculum, and substitutes for BIOL 122 on the major and minor in biology. Four hours. Mr. Conway.

248 — Mathematical Origami There are many connections between the beautiful art of origami and the elegant formality of mathematics. This course will use paper folding as a tool for exploring several areas of mathematics. Topics will include modular origami and graph theory, the relationship between flat folds, conic sections, and algebra, straight edge and compass constructions versus folded constructions, number theory, and linear algebra. Students will develop their skills in creating origami and in making and proving mathematical conjectures. There will be a small fee for supplies. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (mathematics) and partially fulfills the mathematics requirement (old curriculum). Three hours. Ms. Torrence.

266 — Economics of Environmental Issues — This course studies the relationships between the environment and our economic and political systems. Economics can assist in identifying circumstances that give rise to environmental problems, in discovering causes of these problems, and in searching for solutions. The notion of intertemporal economic efficiency and the effect that property rights, externalities, and regulation have on efficiency will be covered. In addition, the economics of natural resource allocation and pollution control will be examined with a strong emphasis on policy analysis. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in social sciences (business/economics) and partially fulfills the social science requirement under the old curriculum, . Three hours. Mr. Lang.

265 — Salvador Dal and Luis Buuel: Artistic and cinematic visions of Spanish Avantgarde — In this course we will analyze the most outstanding works and films by the international Catalan painter and writer Salvador Dala­ and filmaker Luis Buuel. In order to carry out such task, we will use certain theoretical readings on Avantgarde artistic trends of the 1920s and 1930s. To this end, we will read the aesthetic essay La deshumanización del arte (The dehumanization of the Arts) by essayist and thinker Ortega y Gasset, and the classic theoretical text by Matei Calinescu, Five Faces of Modernity. We will also explore the psychoanalytical implications and interpretations of those works that were the result of the collaboration between Dal and Buuel in their early stages of their careers, and those that once both artists split, still establish an aesthetic as well as personal dialog between them. Another significant point to look at is the fascination and influence of Garcia Lorca over the two artists. Along with the former readings, we will consider texts related to Surrealism and Freudian psychology, very popular among Avantgarde artists. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature) and counts as a Western and multidisciplinary course toward the Cross Area Requirements. Four hours. Ms. Bordera-Amerigo.

2006 - 2007 Courses

Fall 2006

HONR 226 — Life Is? This course will introduce students to fundamental concepts in biology by focusing on topics of current interest such as genetic engineering, stem cells, cloning, evolution, and the process of scientific discovery. Principles to be emphasized will include essential chemistry, the cellular basis of life, metabolism, Mendelian inheritance, Darwinian evolution, and a survey of the diversity of life on earth. Partially fulfills the laboratory science requirement under the old curriculum and partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (natural science with laboratory), and substitutes for BIOL 122 on the major/minor in biology. Four hours. Mr. Conway.

HONR 253 — The Nature of Evil: Monsters and Others A study of the nature of evil as portrayed in fiction and film about three iconic figures: Dracula, a representative of supernatural or Satanic evil; the Frankenstein monster, the result of perverted rationalism and science; and Jack the Ripper, a product of innately human or psychopathological evil: all embodiments of our own insecurities and fears of the strange and unfamiliar. Partially fulfills the literature requirement under the old curriculum and partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in literature and the CrossArea Requirement for multidisciplinary courses. Four hours. Mr. Inge.

HONR 255 — Monsters and Modernism Monsters and Modernism, or “Who are you calling weird?†focuses on the human fascination with otherness that can be traced back to ancient Greece and the Cyclops in Homer's Iliad and other mythical halfhuman monsters, and even earlier to the allegorical tales of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. Modern otherness is highlighted in the debates surrounding identity politics: the civil rights, feminist, and in particular, the disability rights movements. This course considers the various theories and methods that social scientists employ to examine identity (including lengthy conversations about postmodernism and alternative epistemologies) in an attempt to better understand how normalcy is socially determined. The examination will include a closer look at popular culture, and specifically how disability and other differences amongst individuals are portrayed in film, television, print media, etc. Students will be expected to read and disseminate a wide variety of sources, write several substantive papers responding to major class themes, and engage in regular Socratic dialog during class meetings and the small groups that will meet. Partially fulfills the social science requirement under the old curriculum, partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the social sciences, counts as a multidisciplinary course toward the CAR requirements, and counts on the sociology major or minor in group 4. Three hours. Mr. Trammell.

HONR 257 — The Real History of Rock and Roll: Political, Social, and Economic Influences on Popular Music from Slavery to the Present This class will cover the history of popular music from its roots in the African Diaspora through the blues, jazz, country, folk, and ultimately, rock and roll. As well as studying the great rock bands, album art, and history making recordings, students will study the evolution of the protest song, Tin Pan Alley, and why certain geographic locations became hubs of musical innovation. Fulfills the arts requirement under the old curriculum and partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (arts). Three hours. Mr. Reynolds.

HONR 258 — Physics of Sports — This course is an introduction to physical principles applied to the games people play. Through computer simulations and applying physical laws to construct mathematical theories, students will come to understand how basic scientific ideas explain situations in athletic encounters. Students should leave the course with a deeper insight into sports as well as an appreciation for how science participates in everyday life. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (natural science without laboratory) and CrossArea Requirement in computing. Three hours. Mr. Franz.

January 2007

HONR 215 — Zen and the Creative Act This course investigates the connections between the Buddhist concept of Zen and the notion of creativity commonly used by visual and conceptual artists. Students study meditation techniques and other physical/mental strategies to accomplish artistic and expressive work. Includes trip to Zen Mountain Monastery in upstate New York. Fulfills the arts requirement under the old curriculum, partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (arts), and counts as a multidisciplinary course toward the CAR requirements. Three hours. Mr. Berry.

HONR 228 — Cervantes' Don Quijote This course will focus on Miguel de Cervantes' bestselling novel Don Quijote de la Mancha. This novel is not only Cervantes' bestknown work, but is considered one of the great masterpieces of world literature, and the work's eponymous protagonist is one of the most famous of all literary creations. The novel will be studied to appreciate the character of Don Quijote, to understand the plot itself and to examine the creativity of its writer, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. In addition to viewing Cervantes' commentaries on Spanish society of the early seventeenth century and its moral fabric, we will also pay particular attention to the role of reading and writing as portrayed in the novel. We will also look at some central themes of the novel such as the complex relation between fiction and reality, the psychology of Don Quijote as we appreciate the often ribald and scatological humor of the novel. El Quijote is a novel that can be studied for a lifetime, and one to and from which every reader will bring their own experience. Because of this, the course also emphasizes the importance of each student reflecting on his or her own reading experiences. Partially fulfills the literature requirement under the old curriculum and partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature). Three hours. Mr. Malin.

Spring 2007

HONR 225 — Discovering Women in the Biological Sciences This course will examine the contributions of women to the scientific discovery of major principles in various biological fields. Basic biological principles in the various fields will be introduced, and biographies/autobiographies and scientific publications of women working as scientists in those fields will be studied. The course will also explore the history and politics of women's involvement in biology and examine how science has viewed women. The status of contemporary women scientists and the difficulties they have encountered will be investigated. Laboratories will parallel biological topics covered in class. Partially fulfills the laboratory science requirement under the old curriculum and partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (natural science with laboratory) and counts on the major/minor in women's studies and substitutes for BIOL 122 on the major/minor biology. Four hours. Ms. Falls

HONR 254 — Mathematica! An exploration of mathematical ideas and topics from computational science using the Mathematica software system. Students will investigate the foundations of computational science in order to understand the essential design decisions upon which the software is built. Topics include number systems (integer, rational, real, and complex), solving equations, plotting, animation, and iteration. Applications that illustrate productive uses of the software will be included, as will opportunities to construct powerful programs to investigate unsolved mathematical research problems. Partially satisfies the mathematics requirement under the old curriculum, satisfies the mathematics requirement in the Natural and Mathematical Sciences Area of Knowledge, and satisfies the CrossArea Requirement in computing. Three hours. Mr. B. Torrence.

HONR 256 — A Time to Kill and Kill Again: What Makes a Serial Killer Tick? This course provides an introduction to the study of serial homicide in the United States. We will explore the nature of multiple murder, the social construction of serial killing, types of serial murders, and the variety of theoretical explanations for serial homicide. We will sociologically analyze problems of media construction, profiling and correcting serial murderer's behavior. Primary objectives are to foster critical thinking in relation to the causes and control of multiple homicide and to explore these problems from a sociological perspective. In addition, we will analyze patterns of serial murder in terms of race, gender, age, and profiling. Partially fulfills the social science requirement under the old curriculum and partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the social sciences (sociology) and counts on the sociology major. Three hours. Ms. Bissler.

HONR 259 — Culture at the Crossroads: Muslims, Christians and Jews in early Iberia Though the reconquest of the Iberian peninsula by the Catholic Kings, completed in the much celebrated year of 1492, set Spain on a course that established her as an identifiably Catholic country into the 21st century, the nearly 800 year period of reconquest was a time in which Muslims and Jews lived alongside Christians in a sometimes peaceful, often uneasy coexistence known as convivencia. In this period where religion defined peoples, Arabic, Hebrew and Latin were, respectively, the languages of faith and of literacy for Muslims, Jews and Christians, but the emerging Latin based language referred to as Romance served as a common language of communication. The cultural uniqueness that defined these eight centuries of the Spanish Middle Ages fostered a golden age of culture for Muslims and Jews on the Iberian peninsula. Their literary traditions influenced evolving Spanish language and culture, infusing it with a distinctiveness that has set it apart from its European neighbors. The present course is intended to introduce students to the interactions of different cultures and different religions as seen through the emergence of literatures in the Romance languages of the Iberian peninsula. These earliest written literary texts of medieval Iberian not only reflect and adapt Arabic, Hebrew and Latin literary forms but also in some cases preserve use of these languages in the earliest written literary texts in Romance. While the course focuses on specifically on the multicultural influences on the literary production of the emerging Spanish nation, students will be encouraged to consider more broadly questions of how language and cultures evolve, especially when in interaction with one another. For the project that will be the basis for a significant portion of the grade in the course, students will be encouraged to consider similar question in other world cultures of interest to them. Partially fulfills the literature requirement under the old curriculum and partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (literature) and the crossarea requirement in nonWestern culture. Three hours. Ms. Hamos.

HONR 260 — Religion in America A study of the development and significance of religion in America. Consideration will be given to the beliefs, practices, and interactions of religious traditions in the United States and how these affected the broader society and were in turn influenced by it. Students will gain an understanding of the role of religion and its importance for American life and thought, past and present. Partially fulfills the philosophy or religion requirement under the old curriculum and partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in Civilizations (Philosophy or Religion) and the crossarea requirement in Western culture and counts as an Area Three (Religion and Culture) course on the Religion major or minor. Three hours. Mr. Breitenberg.

2005 - 2006 Courses

Fall Term 2005

HONR 246 — Disabilities in America Disabilities in America will survey the evolution of Disability Rights in America within the context of historical events, social perceptions, and educational issues. There are currently at least 54 million Americans with disabilities (many more by some counts), or roughly one in every six people, and recent legislation and executive actions are attempts to dismantle many of the remaining barriers that face those with disabilities. Students should come away from the course with a basic understanding of the constitutional evolution of disability law that protects individual rights, a heightened awareness of what disability means in practical and social terms, and an evolving intellectual framework for interpreting disability in history and popular culture. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the social sciences (sociology, new curriculum), partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in social science (old curriculum), and counts on the major or minor in Sociology. Three hours. Mr. Trammell.

HONR 248 — Mathematical Origami There are many connections between the beautiful art of origami and the elegant formality of mathematics. This course will use paper folding as a tool for exploring several areas of mathematics. Topics will include modular origami and graph theory, the relationship between flat folds, conic sections, and algebra, straight edge and compass constructions versus folded constructions, number theory, and linear algebra. Students will develop their skills in creating origami and in making and proving mathematical conjectures. There will be a small fee for supplies. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (mathematics and statistics without laboratory, new curriculum) and partially fulfills the mathematics requirement (old curriculum). Three hours. Ms. Torrence.

HONR 251 — The Law, the Constitution, and the Courts: A Moot Court Approach to Understanding the Judicial Process This Honors course serves as an introduction to the basic principles and procedures of the American judicial process. Topics to be covered include the U.S. Constitution, state and federal law, criminal and civil procedure, trial advocacy and argumentation, and judicial decision making. Students will also gain handson experience with trial preparation and advocacy, as the centerpiece of this course is participation in a regional or national moot court competition, either in a speaking capacity or in a research and support capacity, depending upon student interest. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the social sciences (political science, new curriculum) or partially fulfills the social science requirement (old curriculum). Students majoring or minoring in political science may use this course as an upper division elective course in substitution for PSCI 316, Judicial Process and Behavior. Students who satisfactorily complete this course with a C or better may not enroll in PSCI 316. Three hours. Ms. Bell.

FYEC 107 — FYEC 108 — HONR: Biopolitics Issues for a New Century: Biological and Political Perspectives As we enter the new century, many of the important and perplexing policy issues we face combine politics and science. The purpose of this FYC course pair is to examine these issues employing the perspectives of the biologist and the political scientist. Some of these issues affect national and global security: the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, nuclear power plant security, energy policy, deforestation, global warming, and public health at the national and international levels. Other controversial policy issues linking the natural and the social sciences include emergent technologies that affect our lives: information technology, the human genome and genetic testing, human reproductive technology, and genetically modified organisms and cloning. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (natural science with laboratory) and the Area of Knowledge requirement in the social sciences (political science). Each semester counts as one collegiate honors course. Four hours each semester. Mr. Conway and Mr. Unger.

January 2006

HONR 150 — Will They Live Happily Ever After?: An Introduction to the Fairy Tale Fairy tales have fed man's imagination for centuries. Yet they are a narrative form that traditionally received relatively little attention from critics. Within the last ten years, however, the fairy tales have come into their own as an object of serious study. It is the purpose of this course to introduce students to the study of fairy tales, their origin, meaning, and evolution. The course will begin with a look at different origin theories. We will then study and apply a variety of theories of interpretation, mythological, historical, psychological, and feminist to a number of wellknown tales. The course will close with a look at the way fairy tales continue to appear in contemporary culture, taking on new meaning as they adapt to new cultural norms. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in literature (new curriculum) or partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature (old curriculum). Three hours. Ms. deGraff.

HONR 243 — Homer and Hollywood: The Iliad and the Odyssey in Film The Iliad and the Odyssey of Homer are classics of Greek and Western Literature and have had an enormous impact on high culture in the lofty reaches of great art, music, literature and performance. They deserve such a position and every educated person should learn how to read, comprehend and profit from them. They were also extremely popular and accessible throughout antiquity, and were enjoyed in their own right as smashing good yarns, riveting stories and entrancing performance pieces. This course will not only read and examine all of both works and place them in their appropriate context as literature of the heroic, oral and tragic traditions, but will also explore their themes and images as pop culture entertainment both then and now by examining several films which attempted to either tell the same story or used the themes and plots of the epics in different contexts. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts (new curriculum), partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature or fulfills the collegiate requirement in fine arts (old curriculum), and counts on the major or minor in Classics and the Film Minor. Four hours. Mr. Daugherty.

HONR 249 — Digital Beings The course explores, in computing, literature and film, some aspects of the realities of digital beings and contrasts them with their portrayal. The major computing focus of the course will be on the design, assembly and programming of robots using LEGO parts, sensors, motors, and firmware. The course will examine neural nets and the Turing test of computer intelligence. Students will read and discuss critiques of the Turing test as a standard of computer intelligence. The major computing theme for the course is programming under uncertainty. Lego bots will (be programmed to) perform activities guided by the use of sensors (touch and light) and powered by batteries. As the conditions that the sensors respond to change and battery power diminishes so does the bot's response. Students design, assemble and program robots using LEGO parts, sensors, motors, and firmware and the nqc programming language. Two additional themes will consider the questions: when can a bot computer be said to exhibit intelligence? In what sense can a bot/computer be said learn? For the computing consideration of these two questions the course will examine the Turing test and its critiques as well as neural nets. In addition, students will consider how digital beings are portrayed in literature and film. This course will have a lab component, team project competitions, a course paper and numerous writing assignments (reviews from reading assignments, lab and project reports). After each competition, students will make and be evaluated on oral presentations on the topics of the design, programming and performance of their bot during the project competition. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (computer science with laboratory, new curriculum) and CrossArea Requirement in computing or fulfills the computer intensive course requirement (old curriculum). Four hours. Mr. Leska.

Spring 2006

HONR 123 — The Ascent of Man A seminar on turning points in the cultural evolution of humanity. According to Jacob Bronowski, "Man ascends by discovering the fullness of his own gifts . . . What he creates on the way are monuments to the stages in his understanding of nature and self." Substitutes for History 101 (new curriculum) and the CrossArea Requirements in Multidisciplinary courses and Western culture or HIST 112 (old curriculum). Three hours. Mr. Porter.

HONR 250 — Censorship in the Visual Arts Censorship in the visual arts is inextricably connected to social, political and religious definitions of morality. It is also dependent on distinctly or vaguely determined criteria od aesthetic excellence set either by individuals or institutions. Throughout the centuries censorship has been used for social control, resulting in the suppression of arts works and in some cases in the physical persecution of the creator. This course will examine cases of censorship in the visual arts in western art, from the Renaissance to the twentieth century with particular emphasis on the historical, social and artistic conditions that determined the imposition of restriction on the production or the promotion of particular art works. The course will focus on situating art works within their proper artistic context but also emphasize their role within the societies in which they were created. Through reading of primary sources, we will debate the relative value of art works and evaluate issues of censorship aiming to understanding the specific, actual or perceived threats to the social, political and religious wellbeing of the audiences that these works address. This course is designated as speaking intensive. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in arts and literature (arts, new curriculum) and counts as a multidisciplinary course in the CrossArea Requirement or fulfills the fine arts requirement (old curriculum). This course substitutes for ARTH 310 on the Art History major or minor. Three hours. Ms. Terrono.

HONR 252 — It's About Time "What, then, is time? I know well enough what it is, provided that no one asks me; but if I am asked and try to explain, I am baffled." St. Augustine. Is time merely what clocks measure, or does it have meaning and substance of its own? Is my "now" the same as yours? Is yesterday real? Can we predict tomorrow? The mystery of time engages every area of human inquiry. In this exploration, we will concentrate on scientific understandings of time, but will also examine the philosophical, theological perspectives. Through readings, experiments, and discussion students will construct their own understanding of time and its meaning. Scientifically, we will pursue various ways of thinking about and measuring time, and the notions of spacetime emerging from contemporary physics. We will also consider various ways of conceiving time in the history of religions, and the different perceptions of time expressed in the Bible. The course will culminate in a consideration of the nature of the future: does the flow of time carry us into a future that is already determined, or do our actions in the present shape an open future? Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (natural science with laboratory, new curriculum) and partially fulfills the laboratory science requirement as a physical science (old curriculum). Four Hours. Mr. Spagna.

FYEC 107 — FYEC 108 — HONR: Biopolitics Issues for a New Century: Biological and Political Perspectives As we enter the new century, many of the important and perplexing policy issues we face combine politics and science. The purpose of this FYC course pair is to examine these issues employing the perspectives of the biologist and the political scientist. Some of these issues affect national and global security: the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, nuclear power plant security, energy policy, deforestation, global warming, and public health at the national and international levels. Other controversial policy issues linking the natural and the social sciences include emergent technologies that affect our lives: information technology, the human genome and genetic testing, human reproductive technology, and genetically modified organisms and cloning. Partially fulfills the Area of Knowledge requirement in the sciences (natural science with laboratory) and the Area of Knowledge requirement in the social sciences (political science). Each semester counts as one collegiate honors course. Four hours each semester. Mr. Conway and Mr. Unger.

2004 - 2005 Courses

Fall Term 2004

HONR 226 — Life Is? This course will introduce students to fundamental concepts in biology by focusing on topics of current interest such as genetic engineering, stem cells, cloning, evolution, and the process of scientific discovery. Principles to be emphasized will include essential chemistry, the cellular basis of life, metabolism, Mendelian inheritance, Darwinian evolution, and a survey of the diversity of life on earth. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in laboratory science as a life science course, and substitutes for BIOL 111 on the major/minor in biology. A minimum grade of C in HONR 226 is prerequisite to BIOL 112. Four hours. Mr. Conway.

HONR 244 — Verbal and Visual Composition Premised on the assumption that we live in a world increasingly dominated by verbal and visual texts wherein the two media interact, this course provides an introduction to "reading" and composing verbal and visual texts. Students will analyze verbal and visual communication and explore how the two media can be used to present one's self and life, represent others, construct realities, and make arguments. Fulfills the collegiate requirement in English composition. Three hours. Mr. Sheckels.

HONR 246 — Disabilities in America Disabilities in America will survey the evolution of Disability Rights in America within the context of historical events, social perceptions, and educational issues. There are currently at least 54 million Americans with disabilities (many more by some counts), or roughly one in every six people, and recent legislation and executive actions are attempts to dismantle many of the remaining barriers that face those with disabilities. Students should come away from the course with a basic understanding of the constitutional evolution of disability law that protects individual rights, a heightened awareness of what disability means in practical and social terms, and an evolving intellectual framework for interpreting disability in history and popular culture. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in social science and counts on the major/minor in Sociology. Three hours. Mr. Trammell.

GNED 111 — HONR: Anthropology of the Body GNED 112 HONR: Cultural Representations of the Body Both courses in the duo will revolve around a broad common set of interdisciplinary questions similar to the following: What is the relationship between the body and various centers of selfhood, such as the brain, the mind, the soul, and the spirit? What evolutionary and ecological forces have formed the modern human body? How does society "construct" the body and elements of identity associated with the body, such as race and gender? How and why do standards of beauty and fitness vary crossculturally? What is the nature of health and physical wellbeing? How do we comprehend the vast range of ways of representing the body historically and culturally, from the cave painting to the MRI? Is the body more properly conceived as a biological and social isolate, or as a permeable entity continuous with its environment? How does the politicization of the body shape the rights and responsibilities that come with having one? Four hours each. Mr. London and Ms. Holliday.

January Term 2005

HONR 215 — Zen and the Creative Act This course investigates the connections between the Buddhist concept of Zen and the notion of creativity commonly used by visual and conceptual artists. Students study meditation techniques and other physical/mental strategies to accomplish artistic and expressive work. Includes trip to Zen Mountain Monastery in upstate New York. Fulfills the collegiate requirement in fine arts. Three hours. Mr. Berry.

HONR 243 — Homer and Hollywood: The Iliad and the Odyssey in Film The Iliad and the Odyssey of Homer are classics of Greek and Western Literature and have had an enormous impact on high culture in the lofty reaches of great art, music, literature and performance. They deserve such a position and every educated person should learn how to read, comprehend, and profit from them. They were also extremely popular and accessible throughout antiquity, and were enjoyed in their own right as smashing good yarns, riveting stories and entrancing performance pieces. This course will not only read and examine all of both works and place them in their appropriate context as literature of the heroic, oral and tragic traditions, but will also explore their themes and images as pop culture entertainment both then and now by examining several films which attempted to either tell the same story or used the themes and plots of the epics in different contexts. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature and counts on the major/minor in Classics. Three hours. Mr. Daugherty.

Spring Term 2005

HONR 221 — The History of Scientific Thought from Pythagoras to the Principia This course is a study of the historical development of scientific ideas in the mathematical, physical, and astronomical sciences, from antiquity to the close of the seventeenth century. Since this is an interdisciplinary subject, it requires skills from more than one area, and should be of interest to anyone studying history, philosophy, physics, or mathematics. Students will be expected to analyze and interpret both primary and secondary sources, make considered evaluations of their scientific, philosophical and/or historical significance, and construct cogent arguments in essay form. Partially satisfies the collegiate requirement in history (any future offerings of this course will count as HIST 111). Three hours. Mr. Rice.

HONR 234 — Woody Allen and the Art of Comedy Woody Allen proved to be one of the twentiethcentury's most versatile creative forces as a fiction writer, standup comedian, scriptwriter, playwright, film director, and actor. In all of his comic work, he has been a serious artist with a consistent vision about modern life and society and the human condition. This course will explore that vision through a study and analysis of his writings and work as a major American humorist. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature. Four hours. Mr. Inge.

HONR 245 — Visualizing the Fourth Dimension This is a course on the geometry of fourdimensional space. We begin with an informal analysis of two and threedimensional Euclidean space, and with the Platonic and Archimedean solids in these spaces. Then we explore the analogous structures that exist in four (and even higher) dimensions. Our exploration is primarily visual. We use computer graphics and animation as well as rulerandcompass constructions to create images of higherdimensional objects. We discuss the historical development of the idea of the fourth dimension, as well as its influence on science, technology, and twentieth century art. The only prerequisites are a basic understanding of high school geometry and algebra, and a good imagination. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in mathematics. Three hours. Mr. Hammack.

HONR 247 — Homeland Security The events of September 11th have left deep scars on the American psyche. It is almost inconceivable that the actions of so few men could change the lives of so many. Fourteen months after 9/11, on November 25th, 2002 President George Bush signed into law the Homeland Security Act of 2002. In the most comprehensive reorganization of the nations' security apparatus since the passage of the National Security Act of 1947, a new Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was created. This ongoing reorganization encompasses at least 22 existing federal agencies and impacts as many as 180,000 employees. In its efforts to consolidate the nations' response capabilities to disasters and emergencies, the Bush administration has created a new superbureaucracy eclipsed only by the existing Department of Defense. This course explores the U.S. response to domestic and foreign terrorism. Topics covered include, the origins and cause of political violence, the role of the federal government in homeland security, the impact on state and local governments, the impact on civil rights and civil liberties and present and future threats to U.S. security. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in social science and counts on the major in Political Science. Three hours. Mr. Badey.

GNED 111 — HONR: Anthropology of the Body GNED 112 HONR: Cultural Representations of the Body Both courses in the duo will revolve around a broad common set of interdisciplinary questions similar to the following: What is the relationship between the body and various centers of selfhood, such as the brain, the mind, the soul, and the spirit? What evolutionary and ecological forces have formed the modern human body? How does society "construct" the body and elements of identity associated with the body, such as race and gender? How and why do standards of beauty and fitness vary crossculturally? What is the nature of health and physical wellbeing? How do we comprehend the vast range of ways of representing the body historically and culturally, from the cave painting to the MRI? Is the body more properly conceived as a biological and social isolate, or as a permeable entity continuous with its environment? How does the politicization of the body shape the rights and responsibilities that come with having one? Four hours each. Mr. London and Ms. Holliday.

2003 - 2004 Courses

Fall Term 2003

HONR 212 — Disciplines and Knowledge This course considers the nature of knowledge and its organization into disciplines. Among the questions to be discussed are: What is a discipline? How are disciplines formed and reformed? What questions do given disciplines seek to answer? What kind of thinking does a given discipline promote? How are theories and facts related? Readings will be drawn from politics, science, anthropology, philosophy, psychology, and economics. Satisfies the collegiate requirement in composition. Three hours. Mr. Parker.

HONR 226 — Life Is? This course will introduce students to fundamental concepts in biology by focusing on topics of current interest such as genetic engineering, stem cells, cloning, evolution, and the process of scientific discovery. Principles to be emphasized will include essential chemistry, the cellular basis of life, metabolism, Mendelian inheritance, Darwinian evolution, and a survey of the diversity of life on earth. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in laboratory science as a life science course, and substitutes for BIOL 111 on the major/minor in biology. A minimum grade of C in HONR 226 is prerequisite to BIOL 112. Four hours. Mr. Conway.

HONR 237 — Multiethnic Literatures of the United States This Honors course will introduce students to multiethnic literatures of the United States. We will examine novels, short stories, poetry, essays, and films by Native American, African American, Asian American, and Chicano/a writers and filmmakers, including W. E. B. DuBois, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Toshio Mori, Sandra Cisneros, Louise Erdrich, and Gloria Naylor. Issues we will consider include race, ethnicity, and the immigrant experience; the significance of place and geography; the use of history and memory in ethnic writing; and representations of family and gender. Students will write weekly informal minipapers, participate in a final conference, and discuss course texts. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature. Three hours. Ms. Holliday.

HONR 239 — Women, Men, and Violence This course uses a multidisciplinary approach to exploring the relationships between gender and violence. Drawing on sociology as well as anthropology, psychology, criminal justice and law, we will examine the research and theories behind domestic violence, with a secondary focus on sexual assault and related topics at the community, national, and global levels. The goal of this course is to familiarize students not only with the research literature, but also with the experiences and viewpoints of survivors and perpetrators of violence, service professionals, activists, and politicians. We will pay special attention to two issues: first, how culture shapes our thinking and behavior in regard to gender and violence; and second, how to ameliorate the problems of domestic violence and sexual assault. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in social science. Counts on the major or minor in sociology. Three hours. Mr. London.

January Term 2004

HONR 228 — Cervantes' Don Quijote This course will focus on Miguel de Cervantes' bestselling novel Don Quijote de la Mancha. This novel is not only Cervantes' bestknown work, but is considered one of the great masterpieces of world literature, and the work's eponymous protagonist is one of the most famous of all literary creations. The novel will be studied to appreciate the character of Don Quijote, to understand the plot itself and to examine the creativity of its writer, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. In addition to viewing Cervantes' commentaries on Spanish society of the early seventeenth century and its moral fabric, we will also pay particular attention to the role of reading and writing as portrayed in the novel. We will also look at some central themes of the novel such as the complex relation between fiction and reality, the psychology of Don Quijote as we appreciate the often ribald and scatological humor of the novel. El Quijote is a novel that can be studied for a lifetime, and one to and from which every reader will bring their own experience. Because of this, I will also emphasize the importance for each student to reflect on his or her own reading experiences. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature. 3 hours. Mr. Malin.

Honr 233 — The Science of Structures: Why Things Don't Fall Down This course will explore the concept of mechanical deformation in structures due to stress, strain, and thermal expansion. Basic physical principles associated with each mode of deformation will be introduced, and experimental methods for detection will be studied. The students will examine historic and modern structures to identify architectural methods that inherently use mechanical deformation in their overall design. A brief historical perspective on the advances of materials will be discussed along with the impact that they had on the design of objects. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in laboratory science as a physical science course. Four hours. Ms. Woolard.

HONR 236 — A Journey through the Heart of Mathematics A common misconception among students is that mathematics is all about memorizing formulas and applying them to specific types of problems. They often carry this misconception with them throughout life because their study seldom leads them beyond basic algebra. The purpose of this course is to shatter that misconception. We will take a journey through some of the great and beautiful ideas of mathematics, such as probability, number theory, the concept of infinity, the fourth dimension, chaos theory, and more. Along the way we will be exposed to skills and creative ways of thinking that will help solve problems in any area of life. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in mathematics. Three hours. Mr. Joseph.

HONR 242 — Chemistry of Winemaking Students will become familiar with the various systems of classification of wine and develop an understanding of the grape plant, its variety and taxonomy. The course will include detailed coverage of the production of wine from vine planting and vineyard care to harvesting, fermentation, bottling, aging and shipping. In addition, the student will learn the chemical mechanisms behind the fermentation of natural substances to produce ethanol, as well as the analytical instrumentation used in the quality control, verification, and identification of wines from around the world. The travel portion of the course will include tours of wineries, visits to departments of Enology and Viticulture at researchbased universities, visits to wine laboratories, and handson experience in winemaking. Students must be 21 years of old by the date of the first class meeting. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in laboratory science as a physical science course. Four hours. Ms. Marchetti and Mr. Schreiner.

Spring Term 2004

HONR 231 — Images of Women in Art up to c. AD 1500 This course is a survey of art, from the Paleolithic until the Renaissance, with a special emphasis on images of women in various roles, particularly motherhood. All early cultures (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Classical Greece and Rome, Byzantium and Renaissance Italy) have produced images of women for diverse reasons: from fertility symbols to icons of religious belief, from symbols of beauty and lust to icons of purity and chastity. The course will survey these images as they reflect both the style of art and the role of women in the cultures and time periods. The visual images will be supplemented by brief selections from contemporary literature. Fulfills the collegiate requirement in art and counts on the major or minor in art history, classical studies, and women's studies. 3 hours. Ms. Fisher.

HONR 240 — Economic Justice, Logical Positivism and the End of Justice This Honors course is an historical examination of the major conceptions of economic justice in the West. Traditions examined will include the Greek, Christian, Enlightenment and Marxist schools as well as modern conceptions of justice in writers from Rawls to Nozick. The course will also show how the modern conception of scientific "knowledge" has divided the world of economics into the positive scientific part and the normative moral part. Strict positivist scientists in fact state that this moral part of economics is "meaningless." By examining the history of economic methodology at the turn of the twentieth century, we will see if this claim can be sustained. In particular, we will examine claims in modern macroeconomic theory to see if it can meet the test of verifiability. You might also be surprised to find that all unscientific disciplines in the liberal arts are "meaningless" to the positivists. But there is a verification problem for the scientists as well. Have you ever seen a "meaningless" statement? What is the meaning of all of this? Can Justice stand or is it meaningless? Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in social science. This course may be substituted for ECON 370 on the economics and business major. Three hours. Mr. Brat.

2002 - 2003 Courses

Fall Term 2002

HONR 141 — Her Infinite Variety Cleopatra was a witness to and a shaper of history. Her death is used to mark the end of the Hellenistic Age because she was the last Macedonian monarch, the last Hellenistic ruler to fall to Rome, and the last Pharaoh of Egypt the incarnation of Isis herself. A woman in a man's world, she helped destroy the Roman Republic, and watched the Augustan Principate devour the remains. To Roman men she was a fascination and an archenemy; To Roman women she was a role model and a symbol of the decadent east; To posterity she is an enigma, but her image in film, literature, art and popular culture is ever present.
Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature or substitutes for HIST 111. Counts on the major/minor in classical studies. 3 hours. Mr. Daugherty.

234 — Woody Allen and the Art of Comedy Woody Allen proved to be one of the twentiethcentury's most versatile creative forces as a fiction writer, standup comedian, scriptwriter, playwright, film director, and actor. In all of his comic work, he has been a serious artist with a consistent vision about modern life and society and the human condition. This course will explore that vision through a study and analysis of his writings and work as a major American humorist. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature. Four hours. Mr. Inge.

238 — The Brave New Brain In this course, students will explore the neurobiological foundations of mental health. Topics will include: society's response to mental illness; an overview of neuroanatomy and neurochemistry; the neurobiological factors associated with mental illnesses such as mood disorders, schizophrenia, and obsessivecompulsive disorder; and topics related to the brain's maintenance of homeostatic processes such as stress responses, hunger regulation and immunological functioning. In the midst of the class, emphasis will also be placed on the new discoveries that are rapidly advancing our knowledge of the brain such as advanced neuroimaging techniques and the mapping of the human genome. Classes will consist of lecture, visiting experts, class discussion, and student presentations. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in social science. Three hours. Ms. Lambert.

January Term 2003

237 — Multiethnic Literatures of the United States This Honors course will introduce students to multiethnic literatures of the United States. We will examine novels, short stories, poetry, essays, and films by Native American, African American, Asian American, and Chicano/a writers and filmmakers, including W. E. B. DuBois, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Toshio Mori, Sandra Cisneros, Louise Erdrich, and Gloria Naylor. Issues we will consider include race, ethnicity, and the immigrant experience; the significance of place and geography; the use of history and memory in ethnic writing; and representations of family and gender. Students will write weekly informal minipapers, participate in a final conference, and discuss course texts. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature. Three hours. Ms. Holliday.

Spring Term 2003

123 — The Ascent of Man A seminar on turning points in the cultural evolution of humanity. According to Jacob Bronowski, Man ascends by discovering the fullness of his own gifts . . . What he creates on the way are monuments to the stages in his understanding of nature and self. Substitutes for HIST 112. Three hours. Mr. Porter.

199 — Remember the Maine: America's Imperial Century After a century of manifest destiny and expansion across North America, in 1898 the United States became an imperial power, with possessions stretching across the Caribbean and the western Pacific. In the years between 1898 and 1903, America became sovereign over Puerto Rico, the Panama Canal Zone, Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, and the Philippines, and the U.S. claimed, and exercised, the right to intervene in the affairs of the nations of the Caribbean basin. This course explores the history and politics of the American empire, and the cultural and legal impact imperialism has had on America and its possessions. Topics covered include the politics of accommodation with and resistance to colonialism in the possessions, including contemporary demands for Puerto Rican statehood, Hawaiian sovereignty, and greater autonomy for Guam; the parallels of postcolonial political and social development in the Philippines, Panama, Cuba, and Haiti; the antiimperialist movement in the United States; and how the role of colonizer influenced Americans' perceptions of themselves and their nation's role in the world. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in social science. Three hours. Mr. Turner.

229 — Writing and Romance This writing intensive course will have a dual focus on the versatile romance in the late Middle Ages and different kinds of literary analysis through which this form may be studied. Beginning with the epic The Song of Roland, the course will sample a variety of French and English medieval romances, including The Lays of Marie de France, Arthurian romances of Chr�tien de Troyes, Havelok the Dane, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Students will study and gain practice in writing close textual, formal, and historical analyses and be introduced to some selected post modern approaches to literature. Fulfills the collegiate requirement in composition OR partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in literature. Three hours. Ms. Goodwin.

236 A Journey through the Heart of Mathematics A common misconception among students is that mathematics is all about memorizing formulas and applying them to specific types of problems. They often carry this misconception with them throughout life because their study seldom leads them beyond basic algebra. The purpose of this course is to shatter that misconception. We will take a journey through some of the great and beautiful ideas of mathematics, such as probability, number theory, the concept of infinity, the fourth dimension, chaos theory, and more. Along the way we will be exposed to skills and creative ways of thinking that will help solve problems in any area of life. Partially fulfills the collegiate requirement in mathematics. Three hours. Mr. Joseph.

* Honors Courses are developed specifically for the Honors Program, and we often have several new courses being developed each year. These newly developed courses will be assigned a course number for Spring pre-registration.